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Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.
by Paula Bernstein
July 3, 2014 9:47 AM
6 Comments
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12 Essential 70s Films Streaming on Netflix Now: 'Five Easy Pieces,' 'The Conversation' and More

The 1970s were the heyday of a certain kind of cinema, often referred to as the "American New Wave," when directors were experimenting with unconventional storytelling and darker themes. Though it was released in 1967, Arthur Penn's "Bonnie and Clyde" helped usher in the 70s cinema with its counter-culture themes and raw depiction of violence and sexuality. The 70s were a decade of social upheaval throughout the nation as well as a seismic shift in the classic Hollywood system.

'Five Easy Pieces'

Thanks to Netflix and other streaming services, we can now watch (or re-visit) some of the quintessential films of the 70s, many of which represent individuals isolated from or alienated by society. Though the films listed below range in subject matter and tone -- it's quite a jump from "Annie Hall" to "Panic and Needle Park," for instance -- as a whole, they represent the mood of a nation in transition, and a film culture churning with new ideas and energy.

The films featured below were directed by some of the seminal directors of the decade, including Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma, John Cassavetes, Robert Altman, Peter Bogdanovich, Sidney Lumet, Woody Allen, Bob Rafaelson and Paul Mazursky (who passed away this week). They are listed in chronological order (from most recent to oldest):

READ MORE: 10 Great Sundance Film Festival Hits Streaming on Netflix Now

"Manhattan" (Woody Allen, 1979)

"An Unmarried Woman" (Paul Mazursky, 1978)

"Annie Hall" (Woody Allen, 1977)

"Carrie" (Brian De Palma, 1976)

"The Conversation" (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974)

"Don't Look Now" (Nicolas Roeg, 1973)

"The Long Goodbye" (Robert Altman, 1973)

"Paper Moon" (Peter Bogdanovich, 1973)

"Serpico" (Sidney Lumet, 1973)

"Minnie and Moskowitz" (John Cassavetes, 1971)

"Panic in Needle Park" (Jerry Schatzberg, 1971)

"Five Easy Pieces" (Bob Rafaelson, 1970)

6 Comments

  • luke | July 8, 2014 9:07 AMReply

    I just wanna thank you for sharing your information and your site or blog this is simple but nice article I've ever seen i like it i learn something today.
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  • Aj | July 4, 2014 4:30 PMReply

    Get more titles, Unblock All Netflix regions including American Netflix using this simple trick thevpn.guru/how-change-my-netflix-region-vpn-dns-proxy/

  • Theo | July 3, 2014 9:08 PMReply

    Nice to see Minnie & Moskovitz there. Beware of Netflix's DVD service...three weeks ago, without informing customers, they eliminated Saturday processing and mailing, effectively reducing the maximum viewable per month from 28 to 14 (for a 3-at-a-time plan). When telephoned, they said they had decided to keep mum about it and only tell customers who bother to call. I anticipate a class action suit...

  • Paul Tatara | July 3, 2014 3:00 PMReply

    Only about 80 to go, and Netflix will be worth the trouble.

  • Gramps | July 3, 2014 9:57 PM

    Hahahahhahahaha!! Well played, grandpa. 70s movies are the worst - abysmally uneven pacing, washed-out colors, ridiculous meandering storylines, no meaning/depth to anything. The 40s/50s are way better/more sensible, as is everything post 80. For some reason the films of the 60s and 70s (oh, wait, we all know the reason, DRUGS), are as loopily awful as a bad trip.

  • Brando | July 3, 2014 1:01 PMReply

    Manhattan. One of my all time favorites. The type of movie that made me truly love movies.