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by Paula Bernstein
January 10, 2014 4:42 PM
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5 Daily Tech Stories That Filmmakers (and Film Fans) Must Read: YouTube Nation, Crazy CES Gadgets and More

1. YouTube Nation:  YouTube and DreamWorks Animation are co-producing "YouTube Nation," an original program to air daily on YouTube, Variety reports. The show looks to be a daily highlight reel of what's trending on YouTube and could launch as early as the end of January.

2. "Little Feet:" Eric Kohn reviewed Alexandre Rockwell's film "Little Feet," calling it "the first great movie of 2014." While the film is playing at The Museum of the Moving Image’s “First Look” series, which runs from January 10 - 19, it will otherwise be available on Vimeo beginning in March. As Kohn writes, since Vimeo offered a special revenue-sharing deal involving a $10,000 advance for filmmakers who distribute their work on the platform, we have yet to see an effective case study of the approach working wonders. This could be the example we've been waiting for, as Kohn says the film "might not generate millions of dollars, but in the context of online-only releases, stands to perform decently when it hits Vimeo in March." Check out the trailer on SnagFilms.

3. WGA VideoGame Awards: The writers of "Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag," "Batman: Arkham Origins," "God of War: Ascension," "The Last of Us" and "Lost Planet 3" have been nominated for videogame writing awards by the Writers Guild of America. Read more here.

4. Crazy Gadgets at CES 2014: We wrote about the 7 must-have filmmaking tools we discovered at CES 2014, but over the past few days at CES 2014, we've seen countless other cool gizmos intended to entertain and/or make your life easier, including smart watches, wireless speakers and lots of snazzy cell phone cases. Check out the craziest, coolest gadgets from this year's CES here.

5. Aereo Goes to Supreme Court: The future of streaming television could be determined this spring when the Supreme Court will hear the dispute over Aereo, the startup which allows users to use an antenna to access over-the-air television. Broadcasters are hoping to quash the service, which they believe violates their copyrights. "We remain unwavering in our confidence that Aereo’s technology falls squarely within the law and our team will continue to work hard to provide our consumers with best-in-class technology that delights and adds meaningful value to their lives," said Aereo in a statement.

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