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by Paula Bernstein
April 28, 2014 11:51 AM
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8 Smart Things Things Said at Tribeca Innovation Week About The Future of Film, Technology and Storytelling

On a Human Scale at Tribeca Innovation Week

With the ongoing goal of narrowing the gap between the creative and tech worlds, The Tribeca Film Festival introduced Tribeca Innovation Week this year. Incorporating the already established "Future of Film" series, the week also featured a variety of events which emphasized collaboration between storytellers and innovators in the film world, including Games for Change, Storyscapes and TFI Interactive.

Here are 8 highlights from the week which focused on how filmmakers are utilizing technology to create the the future of storytelling:

1. "Our world has changed so much since we started the festival. When you think back 12 years ago, there wasn't Vine or Google. We weren't talking about tweeting. The ways we communicated with each other and told our stories was vastly different." -- Jane Rosenthal, introducing two interactive films, "Possibilia" and "The Gleam"

2. "You have to join the dots between funding the work, supporting the work, distributing the work, exhibiting the work and building a community around the work." - Ingrid Kopp, Director, Digital Initiatives, Tribeca Film Institute at TFI Interactive

3. "I see these human yearnings to virtualize reality fully and-- when we are in the movie world, that magical border land, we're in the realm of the imagination where anything is possible. The appeal of cinema as the most immersive technology is appealing because it allows us to soar at the speed of thought. One of the coolest ideas behind the film 'Inception' is that the entire film was widely reported on the internet to be a metaphor for cinema. Cinema creates an artificial dream world and invites the audience into that dream that we then fill with our subconscious. We already have dream sharing technology. It's called cinema." -- filmmaker and futurist Jason Silva

Jason Silva NatGeo

4. "Every day we're taking seemingly random events in our lives and finding the narrative within it," The Daniels, Daniel Scheinert and Daniel Kwan, creators of interactive films "Possibilia" and "The Gleam" said. "We wanted to explore how we could make films in which the viewer searches for the narrative instead of being fed it. Interactivity is simply an opportunity to explore themes we find very compelling. We didn’t set out to create anything groundbreaking — we just want these films to be good stories like any other film."

5. "Movies are awesome. Look where we are. Films have nothing to worry about. There is no war going on. Film is not going to lose. Television is not going to lose and theater is not going to lose. No matter how much binge-watching there is...I don't believe anything is ever going to replace the feeling of sitting in a theater with a bunch of strangers when the lights go down and something happens on the stage or the screen." But, he acknowledged, "maybe I'm living in one of my own romantic fantasies." -- Aaron Sorkin

6.  "We consider ourselves curators of great stories. Once upon a time, a documentary was a film you saw in a movie theater, a news report was something you watched on 60 Minutes. Now all of these things are happening in the same place, and these labels and formats matter less than they ever have. The content isn't being described by the shape of the container anymore." - Upworthy's co-founder Eli Pariser at "All The News That's Fit to Shoot, Print...Or Tweet" panel.

7. "Cinema is a mirror we hold up to ourselves." - filmmaker and futurist Jason Silva

8. "What is the pan or the close-up? How do we write this language of what it is? This is a whole new language." -- Nonny de la Peña, creator of "Use of Force," part of Storyscapes, at TFI Interactive.

Below you can see the Storify version of TFI Interactive 2014:

1 Comment

  • Dave Barak | April 28, 2014 4:03 PMReply

    "Cinema is a mirror we hold up to ourselves."

    How trite.