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A 17-Year-Old Girl Creates Twivo, a Program to Save the World From Twitter TV Spoilers

Photo of Alison Willmore By Alison Willmore | Indiewire May 8, 2013 at 12:53PM

Twitter has become for television what talking in the lobby after the credits is for film, a place where people gather to discuss what they just watched, or for TV more often what they're in the process of watching. Social media during airings of new shows, especially internet favorites like "Game of Thrones" or "The Walking Dead," becomes a minefield for anyone not watching along live and hoping to avoid spoilers, or in a different country or time zone.
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Jennie Lamere
Jennie Lamere

Twitter has become for television what talking in the lobby after the credits is for film, a place where people gather to discuss what they just watched, or for TV more often what they're in the process of watching. Social media during airings of new shows, especially internet favorites like "Game of Thrones" or "The Walking Dead," becomes a minefield for anyone not watching along live and hoping to avoid spoilers, or in a different country or time zone.

Which is why the world needs Twivo, a program invented by 17-year-old New Hampshire high school senior Jennie Lamere, who won "best use of sync-to-broadcast" and then "best in show" for Twivo at Boston's TVnext Hack event. Twivo is a plug-in that blocks tweets according to tags set by a user for a set time period -- then it, ingeniously, saves them for later. Tweets from more influential users, like the official Twitter handle for a show, will show up bigger during playback thanks to use of the Klout API. The spoiler-phobic would no longer need to keep off social media during their favorite series.

READ MORE: Second Screen: The Future of TV, or The Latest Sign of Our Shrinking Attention Spans?

According to Mother Jones, Twivo is still in demo form and won't be ready for use for another few weeks, but Lamere's already been approached by a tech company called Furious Minds who want to help her market the final product, so it could be available very soon as a solution to second screen difficulties (and first world problems). And Lamere is not just impressively young, she was also the only female to present a project at the hackathon. Check out Lamere and other contestants discussing their programs in front of judges from USA Network, VH1 and MIT below.


This article is related to: Television, TV News, Twitter, Second Screen





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