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AFI Grad Sees Dream of Film Production Company Become a Reality

Indiewire By Indiewire | Indiewire December 3, 1997 at 2:0AM

by Jessica ShulsingerFrustrated by the unfamiliar and often halting path many film schoolgraduates find themselves in after completing film school, an aspiringfilmmaker has created a film finance company of her own. Entirelyindependently funded, American Film Institute graduate Liliana Olivares'company, Rosebud Moving Image Artists, assists filmmakers with seed money -$6,000 - and helps them through the administrative paperwork of obtainingSAG and WGA permits, contract requirements, location permits, etc.By January of 1998, Rosebud plans to see its first seeded project beginshooting, and expects to start production on six more films next year. Sofar -- Rosebud is barely a year old -- most of the projects Olivarers'company has helped get off the ground have come to Rosebud from AFIgraduates or by word of mouth. Olivares says she looks for films that are"do-able" -- that seem workable and have a clear project vision from thetime of conception --- and that are primarily project of first-timefilmmakers. As Rosebud continues to grow, Olivares certainly anticipateshaving more than six films in production per year. For right now, they areconcentrating on what they can successfully manage.Rosebud is likely to be viewed as a welcome addition by independentfilmmakers to the usually difficult entry into film production. Olivaressays she designed Rosebud with the vision that new filmmakers could feelconfident both financially and artistically as they suddenly findthemselves teetering on the cusp of their career.She also claims the most important factor in creating the company was beingable to ensure filmmakers with complete creative control over their filmthroughout production. Equally significant, filmmakers retain completerights over their final project -- a feature-length film with sights set ondistribution.In addition to seed money, filmmakers are expected to accept advice. Theywork closely with Rosebud's advisory board, composed mainly of AFI facultyand veterans in the mainstream movie world, like Conrad L. Hall ("Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid", "In Cold Blood"), writer/producer/directorLeslie Stevens ("The Outer Limits"), and producer Forrest Murray ("Spitfire Grill"). But Olivares stresses that the advisory board serves primarily toguide filmmakers through the technicalities and logistics of filmmaking,not to control the creative content in any way. "Filmmaking is really askill and an art form, and it deserves respect [toward maintaining thatintegrity]," she concludes.[For more information on Rosebud Moving Image Artists, contact them at213.460.2483]
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by Jessica Shulsinger




Frustrated by the unfamiliar and often halting path many film school
graduates find themselves in after completing film school, an aspiring
filmmaker has created a film finance company of her own. Entirely
independently funded, American Film Institute graduate Liliana Olivares'
company, Rosebud Moving Image Artists, assists filmmakers with seed money -
$6,000 - and helps them through the administrative paperwork of obtaining
SAG and WGA permits, contract requirements, location permits, etc.


By January of 1998, Rosebud plans to see its first seeded project begin
shooting, and expects to start production on six more films next year. So
far -- Rosebud is barely a year old -- most of the projects Olivarers'
company has helped get off the ground have come to Rosebud from AFI
graduates or by word of mouth. Olivares says she looks for films that are
"do-able" -- that seem workable and have a clear project vision from the
time of conception --- and that are primarily project of first-time
filmmakers. As Rosebud continues to grow, Olivares certainly anticipates
having more than six films in production per year. For right now, they are
concentrating on what they can successfully manage.


Rosebud is likely to be viewed as a welcome addition by independent
filmmakers to the usually difficult entry into film production. Olivares
says she designed Rosebud with the vision that new filmmakers could feel
confident both financially and artistically as they suddenly find
themselves teetering on the cusp of their career.


She also claims the most important factor in creating the company was being
able to ensure filmmakers with complete creative control over their film
throughout production. Equally significant, filmmakers retain complete
rights over their final project -- a feature-length film with sights set on
distribution.


In addition to seed money, filmmakers are expected to accept advice. They
work closely with Rosebud's advisory board, composed mainly of AFI faculty
and veterans in the mainstream movie world, like Conrad L. Hall ("Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid", "In Cold Blood"), writer/producer/director
Leslie Stevens ("The Outer Limits"), and producer Forrest Murray ("Spitfire Grill"). But Olivares stresses that the advisory board serves primarily to
guide filmmakers through the technicalities and logistics of filmmaking,
not to control the creative content in any way. "Filmmaking is really a
skill and an art form, and it deserves respect [toward maintaining that
integrity]," she concludes.


[For more information on Rosebud Moving Image Artists, contact them at
213.460.2483]