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AFP: Gandhi no longer 'PC' in militarist India, says director

By Indiewire | Indiewire February 24, 2006 at 9:10AM

Indian-born director Deepa Mehta says admiring independence leader Mahatma Gandhi is no longer politically correct in the country as militarism is on the rise. Speaking at the Bangkok International Film Festival where her controversial film "Water" is showing, Mehta said the pacifism of the man known as the father of the nation no longer fitted in with Indian politics. "It's not PC to say this but I'm an admirer of Gandhi," Mehta told reporters Thursday when asked why she included some of Gandhi's words in her film about the plight of castigated widows in India during the 1930s. "Water" is the last of Mehta's trilogy, following "Fire" (1996) and "Earth" (1998), and depicts the harsh life of widows condemned to live together in disgrace and poverty, a problem which Mehta says many of India's 34 million widows still face today. Agence France Presse reports.
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Indian-born director Deepa Mehta says admiring independence leader Mahatma Gandhi is no longer politically correct in the country as militarism is on the rise. Speaking at the Bangkok International Film Festival where her controversial film "Water" is showing, Mehta said the pacifism of the man known as the father of the nation no longer fitted in with Indian politics. "It's not PC to say this but I'm an admirer of Gandhi," Mehta told reporters Thursday when asked why she included some of Gandhi's words in her film about the plight of castigated widows in India during the 1930s. "Water" is the last of Mehta's trilogy, following "Fire" (1996) and "Earth" (1998), and depicts the harsh life of widows condemned to live together in disgrace and poverty, a problem which Mehta says many of India's 34 million widows still face today. Agence France Presse reports.







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