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by Peter Knegt
January 5, 2011 2:45 AM
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Art Directors Guild Announce 2010 Award Nominees

Publicity image from "Alice in Wonderland." [Image courtesy of Disney]

The Art Directors Guild (ADG) today announced nominations in three categories of Production Design for theatrical motion pictures competing in the ADG's 15th Annual Excellence in Production Design Awards for 2010. There were no significant snubs across the fifteen total nominees, which included the expected likes of "Alice in Wonderland," "Black Swan," "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part I," "Inception," "The King's Speech," "Shutter Island," and "True Grit."

Full list of nominees below. Check out a list of all the awards so far this year here.


Period Film

TRUE GRIT
Production Designer: Jess Gonchor

THE KING'S SPEECH
Production Designer: Eve Stewart

SHUTTER ISLAND
Production Designer: Dante Ferretti

ROBIN HOOD
Production Designer: Arthur Max

GET LOW
Production Designer: Geoffrey Kirkland


Fantasy Film

ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Production Designer: Robert Stromberg

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1
Production Designer: Stuart Craig

INCEPTION
Production Designer: Guy Hendrix Dyas

TRON: LEGACY
Production Designer: Darren Gilford

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER
Production Designer: Barry Robison


Contemporary Film

BLACK SWAN
Production Designer: Therese DePrez

THE SOCIAL NETWORK
Production Designer: Donald Graham Burt

THE FIGHTER
Production Designer: Judy Becker

THE TOWN
Production Desinger: Sharon Seymour

127 HOURS
Production Designer: Suttirat Larlarb


Deadline for final voting, which is done online, is February 3. The black-tie ceremony announcing winners will take place Saturday, February 5, 2010 from the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills with Paula Poundstone serving as host for the second consecutive year.

Theme of this year's awards ceremony is "Designs on Film" as a tribute to Cathy Whitlock's new HarperCollins book that traces 100 years of Hollywood Art Direction. A Lifetime Achievement Award will go to Production Designer Patricia Norris with director David Lynch set to present to her. In addition, the ADG will induct the following legendary Production Designers from the past into its Hall of Fame: Alexander Golitizen, Albert Heschong and Eugene Lourie. This year's Art Directors Guild Cinematic Imagery Award will be presented to Syd Dutton and Bill Taylor, long-time visual effects artists from the legendary company, Illusion Arts. Filmmaker Cindy Peters' will present a special short video about the many diverse tasks performed by Art Department craftpersons featuring interviews with seasoned and aspiring members of ADG.

The Art Directors Guild represents nearly 2,000 members who work throughout the United States, Canada and the rest of the world in film, television and theater as Production Designers, Art Directors, and Assistant Art Directors; Scenic, Title and Graphic Artists; Illustrators and Matte Artists; and Set Designers and Model Makers.

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4 Comments

  • Rose | February 3, 2011 2:06 AMReply

    The Art Director's Guild only nominates within their members. The production designer on Imaginarium is from Toronto and was not eligible. This is also the reason Boardwalk Empire was not nominated in its category this year given that BE's production designer is from New York.

  • RobT | January 5, 2011 7:58 AMReply

    Don't know about the Art Directors Guild criteria for eligibility, but considering that Imaginarium was up for several awards last year (including the art direction Oscar) I'd guess that the Guild passed it over at that time. (Last year's fantasy nominees were Avatar, District 9, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Star Trek and Where the Wild Things Are.)

  • Jon Barr | January 5, 2011 7:44 AMReply

    What about The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus?

  • RobT | January 5, 2011 6:57 AMReply

    Looking over these nominations, I asked myself "wait a minute, didn't they just shoot 127 Hours on location?" Then I realized that they couldn't just stick James Franco into a crevice and put cameras in with him, that they'd have to actually build a set for it. As it turns out, the set was so convincing that, for me, the question of whether it was actually a set or not never even came up until just now. Makes me wonder if 127 Hours has an outside chance at an art direction Oscar nomination.