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Attention, Aspiring Filmmakers: Here's How You Can Go To Iceland This Fall

By Oliver MacMahon | Indiewire July 2, 2014 at 3:21PM

These days, making films in the States is simply boring. Too many fakers, too many issues, too many worries. But you know what place doesn't have these problems? Iceland. So the Reykjavik International Film Festival’s Talent Lab is inviting aspiring filmmakers to visit.
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The scene in Iceland.
Basil Tsiokos The scene in Iceland.

These days, making films in the States is simply boring. Too many fakers, too many issues, too many worries. But you know what place doesn't have these problems? Iceland; the home of pickled herring, rye bread, and Brennivin (A.K.A 'Black Death'). It's a freaking utopia.

So the Reykjavik International Film Festival’s Talent Lab is inviting aspiring filmmakers planning their first feature-length film to Iceland "to work on their ideas under the guidance of an experienced filmmaker." The program will include workshops, talks, industry meetings, screenings, pitch sessions and parties -- last year’s events included "a cocktail at the President’s pad, ouzo at the Greek consulate, a live music film screening with Hjaltalin and an after party where Björk DJ-ed from a closet." There's even a "Golden Egg" for the Gander or Goose whose short film is voted best. 

It's not just fun and fish: Over the past few years, guests have also received master classes from leading award-winning filmmakers such as Bela Tarr ("The Turin Horse,""Satantango"), James Marsh ("Man on a Wire," "Project Nim") and Laurent Cantet ("The Class," "Time Out"). Doesn't that all just sound awesome?

Deadline for applications is July 15th. For more information, go to their website.

This article is related to: Reykjavik, Film Festival, Iceland , Béla Tarr, James Marsh, Laurent Cantet







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