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Brooklyn to Screen 100+ Films at Seventh Festival

Indiewire By Indiewire | Indiewire June 1, 2004 at 2:0AM

Brooklyn to Screen 100+ Films at Seventh Festival
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Brooklyn to Screen 100+ Films at Seventh Festival

by Sandra Ogle



Joyce Perrone in Kimi Takesue's "Summer of the Serpent," which will play at the Brooklyn International Film Festival. Photo by: Richard Beenen, courtesy of the filmmakers.


The seventh-annual Brooklyn International Film Festival rolls into the Brooklyn Museum of Art on June 4 with a screening of Ramon de Espana's "Kill Me Tender" at 7 p.m. A live performance by Italian singer Antonella Ruggiero follows.

Over the course of 10 days, the former Williamsburg Brooklyn Film Festival will screen 100 films from 30 countries, chosen from more than 1,600 submissions from 74 countries. Narrative shorts and features, full-length documentaries, and experimental and animation features are all included in this year's line up, dubbed "Stretch" by festival organizers.

The Iranian feature "Dead Heat Under the Shrubs," in which a teenage boy witnesses a murderer dispose of a dead body, will have its world premiere on opening night. Other screenings include: the Oscar-nominated "Ferry Tales," Katja Esson's documentary about a gaggle of women on their daily Staten Island Ferry commute; "We Have Decided Not to Die," Daniel Askill's experimental Australian film; Adam Vardy's "Mendy," about an Orthodox Jewish man who leaves behind his insular world, and the world premiere of "Fork Over the Chopstick," an experimental animation short by Ted Hinojosa. Debra Granik's lauded Sundance award-winning drama "Down to the Bone" will have its New York premiere on June 12, preceded by Kimi Takesue's "Summer of the Serpent." The festival will also have two programs for children on June 6, featuring performances by students from Middle School 143 in Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

A panel of journalists and film industry professionals award the best film in each category a Chameleon statuette; the best film out of those five winners is awarded $30,000 at the closing ceremonies on June 13. Marco Ursino, who founded the festival in 1998, continues on this year as festival director.

There will be a live cybercast provided by the multimedia technologies company Metal Tiger Vision throughout the duration of the festival. Films in competition, interviews with actors, and special events can be viewed 24 hours a day.

[For more information, please visit: http://www.wbff.org.]