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Cannes Clicks: Day 8 at indieWIRE and Around the Web

Photo of Nigel M Smith By Nigel M Smith | Indiewire May 18, 2011 at 4:24AM

Each day at the Cannes Film Festival (May 11 - 22), indieWIRE is publishing an updated compilation of articles from indieWIRE, our blog network and other outlets.
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Each day at the Cannes Film Festival (May 11 - 22), indieWIRE is publishing an updated compilation of articles from indieWIRE, our blog network and other outlets.

More: Latest Reviews | Latest Interviews | Complete Coverage

Blogs: Anne Thompson | Eric Kohn | The Playlist | Sydney Levine | Eugene Hernandez

indieWIRE

One of the festival's most anticipated titles, Lars Von Trier's sci-fi downer "Melancholia," screened in the wee hours of the morning. The verdict according to Eric Kohn: "A dark apocalyptic masterpiece." Click here to read Kohn's full review.

As for Von Trier's own verdict? "Maybe it’s crap actually. Of course I hope not, there’s quite a bit of possibility this is really not worth seeing.” That's just one choice quote the Cannes vet made at the press conference following the film's unveiling. Among the others: "OK, I’m a Nazi"..."Oh, ‘Melancholia’ is a comedy. You should see what happens when I try tragedy"...And, "We had fun doing this film, but I would like to talk about my next film which is - as Kirsten insisted - is going to be a porn film."

After the worldwide press had a field day with Von Trier's explosive Nazi comment, the director was quick to offer an official apology via a press release. In it, he simply states that "he let himself be egged on by provocation."

Kohn also caught Aki Kaurismaki’s deadpan comedy "Le Havre." "Combining his economical storytelling with a life-affirming plot, Kaurismaki churns a fundamental scenario through his own unique narrative tendencies, yielding a product both heartwarming and irreverent, two qualities that should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with his distinctive touch," wrote Kohn in his review. "Beyond that, it also introduces an element of political commentary to the director’s work that deepens its impact."

As always, keep checking our Cannes Guide to All the Films for the latest criticWIRE additions.

iW Blog Network

The Playlist got caught up in the Von Trier mania on La Croisette. First up they reviewed the film (slapping it with a C+), reported on the outrageous press conference and investigated whether Von Trier's next project will in fact be a porn film.

Anne Thompson weighed in on where she thinks the Tilda Swinton-starring "We Need to Talk About Kevin" will find a home. "At the premiere, green-eyed Tilda Swinton looked every inch the statuesque movie star with a light blond bob, candy pink lips and backless dark azur blue and purple Haider Ackermann sheath," she wrote. "Having won a supporting actress nod Oscar for 'Michael Clayton' as well as top notices for 'I Am Love', a small distributor with the right deft marketing touch—I’d pick Roadside Attractions, but they appear not to be chasing hard after this—could deploy a Swinton awards campaign to turn this tough little movie into a must-see."

Around the Web

Von Trier's Hitler musings took center stage in the majority of reports on the "Melancholia" press conference. Movieline summed it up best: "Von Trier embarrassed himself, but it wouldn’t be surprising if he alienated Dunst for good. Every press-conference attendee loves a freak show — we’re all looking for great copy — but this one ended on a note that was just weird and sad. Melancholic, even." Other outlets on what went down: The Hollywood Reporter, Reuters, Entertainment Weekly and The Wall Street Journal.

Click here to watch the entire thing.

To bring things back to the film at hand, check out the reviews that hit early this morning: Entertainment Weekly (positive), Obsessed with Film (positive), The Guardian (negative), Movieline (positive), The Hollywood Reporter (mostly negative) and Screen Daily (mostly negative).

This article is related to: Cannes Film Festival, Melancholia







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