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Chatting with Daniels

By Indiewire | Indiewire July 20, 2006 at 6:52AM

"People don't understand my movies or they love my movies," explains producer-turned-director Lee Daniels in a New York Times profile today. "There's no gray area here. And that's O.K., because if everybody did get it, I would think I was doing something wrong." Daniels as a track record of luring top talent to work on his film, in particular the upcoming "Shadowboxer", which he directed (the film opens Friday in theaters):A-list actors are attracted to his small films (budgets are usually under $5 million) because, he said, they know the experience of making them will be an "adventure." "It's a little Euro, a little homo and a little ghetto, and they love being in that world," the openly gay Mr. Daniels said, adding: "They work for nothing and some potato chips. And I demand that everybody check all egos at the door, and they dare not defy me because they know I'm a little off myself."
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"People don't understand my movies or they love my movies," explains producer-turned-director Lee Daniels in a New York Times profile today. "There's no gray area here. And that's O.K., because if everybody did get it, I would think I was doing something wrong." Daniels as a track record of luring top talent to work on his film, in particular the upcoming "Shadowboxer", which he directed (the film opens Friday in theaters):

A-list actors are attracted to his small films (budgets are usually under $5 million) because, he said, they know the experience of making them will be an "adventure." "It's a little Euro, a little homo and a little ghetto, and they love being in that world," the openly gay Mr. Daniels said, adding: "They work for nothing and some potato chips. And I demand that everybody check all egos at the door, and they dare not defy me because they know I'm a little off myself."






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