Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

DAILY NEWS: Latino Shorts to Unspool (en masse) at First NY Latino Fest

Indiewire By Indiewire | Indiewire May 25, 2000 at 2:0AM

Latino Shorts to Unspool (en masse) at First NY Latino Fest by Jorge Aguirre(indieWIRE/5.25.00) -- The First New York International Latino Film Festival will screen not only the best in recent feature films by and about Latinos, but it also boasts one of the largest samplings of works of Latino shorts. From May 31st to June 4th, audiences will be treated to over 60 narrative, documentary, and experimental short films by filmmakers from the U.S. and Latin America. In conjunction with the festival, The Mexican Film Institute and the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York will also screen a program of recent Mexican shorts.
0

Latino Shorts to Unspool (en masse) at First NY Latino Fest




by Jorge Aguirre


(indieWIRE/5.25.00) -- The First New York International Latino Film Festival will screen not only the best in recent feature films by and about Latinos, but it also boasts one of the largest samplings of works of Latino shorts. From May 31st to June 4th, audiences will be treated to over 60 narrative, documentary, and experimental short films by filmmakers from the U.S. and Latin America. In conjunction with the festival, The Mexican Film Institute and the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York will also screen a program of recent Mexican shorts.

The strength in what the NYILFF describes as their Vanguard Section of the short films lies in its diversity says NYILFF Director, Calixto Chinchilla. "We'll be able to show stuff that not all our features have," says Chinchilla in describing a program which includes Sonia Gonzalez's "Debutante", about a young woman with dreams of a life beyond 116th Street to Bernardo Ruiz's film, "The Devil's Twilight," which spans Brooklyn to Mexico, and Edwin Figueroa's "Taino," told against the Manhattan art scene and a boy's visions of an ancient Puerto Rican Indian -- a celebration of diversity explodes en masse across the screen.

But the common ideal which unites these filmmakers is that these are not simply films told by Latinos for Latinos, but are stories which cross cultural and ethnic boundaries to a much broader audience.

"I think that we Latinos have a much broader vision....than most [people] think. There's a multiplicity of experience in being Latino,