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by Indiewire
October 25, 2001 2:00 AM
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DAILY NEWS: World's Longest Festival Reveals its Roster for 16th Edition

DAILY NEWS: "Safety" Deal; and New This Week



by Eugene Hernandez and Brian Brooks/indieWIRE



(indieWIRE/10.25.01) -- Dubbed the world's longest festival, the Fort
Lauderdale International Film Festival
, has revealed its complete lineup
for its 16th annual event. Nine U.S. premieres, three world premieres
and a record seventeen first features are included in the roster with the
'70s coming of age comedy, "What Ever Happened to Harold Smith" by Michael Legge set to open the fest's main program. Debut director Miles Goodloe's "A Gentleman's Game" starring Gary Sinise, Philip Baker Hall and Dylan Baker will make its world premiere as will Greg Yaitanes' mob comedy "Plan B" starring Diane Keaton and Paul Sorvino and the German romantic story, "Josephine."


Cannes 2001 Golden Palme winner, "The Son's Room," by Italian Nanni Moretti and Sundance audience award winner "Dogtown and Z-Boys" (also awarded the documentary directing award at Sundance) by Stacy Peralta will screen during the event along with sneak previews of the Pedro and Agustin Almodovar-produced film, "The Devil's Backbone" by Guillermo Del Toro and Peter Bogdanovich's "The Cat's Meow." Lion's Gate's "Lantana" by Ray Lawrence, starring Anthony LaPaglia, Barbara Hershey and Geoffrey Rush will close the twenty-four day festival which will run October 19 - November 11. [Brian Brooks]


>> YESTERDAY in indieWIRE DAILY NEWS: "Safety" Deal; and New This Week



(indieWIRE/10.24.01) -- IFC Films has nabbed Rose Troche's Toronto
International Film Festival
debut, "The Safety of Objects"; And,
an '80s period-sci-fi-coming-of-ager, a love story between an
older man and a woman who may be from another planet, a documentary
about homosexuality in the Orthodox Jewish community -- who said
independent film was dead? This week's indie releases offer hope
for anyone who had doubts about formula and commercialism
swallowing up our cinema's screens.


GET THE FULL STORY @ indieWIRE.com

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