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Eclectic Mix for the 10th Film Comment Selects Series

Photo of Nigel M Smith By Nigel M Smith | Indiewire February 4, 2010 at 3:59AM

Celebrating its 10th anniversary, this year's first Film Comment Selects series (February 19 - March 4) presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, will screen an eclectic mix of films that span from art-film rarities to George A. Romero's latest zombie film.
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Celebrating its 10th anniversary, this year's first Film Comment Selects series (February 19 - March 4) presented by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, will screen an eclectic mix of films that span from art-film rarities to George A. Romero's latest zombie film.

Opening night will feature a screening of Jonathan's Kaplan's "Over the Edge". Made in 1979, the teen drama features an early performance by Matt Dillon. Originally pulled at the time of its initial release due to its violent content, the film has gone on to gain a large cult following. A cast and crew reunion will follow the screening.

The series will close with last year's Cannes nominated "The Time That Remains" from Palestinian-Israeli director Elia Suleiman. The semi-autobiographical film spans a 50-year period, examining the creation of Israel.

Also of note, French experimental filmmaker Phillipe Grandrieux will be present at screenings of his films "Un Lac," "La Vie Nouvelle," and "Sombre". A choice selection of Godard rarities will also screen, including material from his time in America and TV appearances.

Other highlights include a Kiyoshi Kurosawa Double Bill ("The Revenge: A Visit from Fate" and "The Revenge: A Scar That Never Fades"); Paul Greengrass's "Green Zone"; Carl Foreman's classic "The Victors," and "Applause" starring Danish star Paprika Steen.

[For the full series calendar go to www.filmlinc.com]

This article is related to: Festivals





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