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by Indiewire
June 20, 2013 10:16 AM
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Fall Festival Wishlist: The 50 Films We Hope To See in Venice, Toronto and/or Telluride

"Devil's Knot" (directed by Atom Egoyan)
Considering Atom Egoyan's Canadian roots, a Toronto premiere seems to be a lock for his latest film, a crime drama based on the infamous "West Memphis Three" 1993 trial involving the incarceration of a trio of teenagers for the murder of three children. The convicted teens were released after the case was reopened in 2010. Showing at Venice would be a first for the director, who has been something of a semi-regular at Cannes with his past work. But with the film's substantial star power, including Reese Witherspoon and Colin Firth, a visit to the Lido could be a viable way for "Devil's Knot" to gain exposure and build even more awards buzz prior to its yet-to-be-announced fall release date in the US. [Clint Holloway]

"Diana" (directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel) and "Grace of Monaco" (directed by Olivier Dahan)
These dueling tales of contemporary, beloved princesses are both slated for year-end releases, and one or both could pop up at a fall festival (though both seem more like Toronto fare than anything else). Starring BFFs Naomi Watts and Nicole Kidman as Princess Diana and Princess Grace, respectively, each film takes on a specific period in its subject's life. For Diana, it's the two years leading up to her untimely death in 1997. For Grace, it's a crisis of marriage and identity during a dispute between Monaco's Prince Rainier III and France's Charles De Gaulle and a looming French military invasion of the principality in the early 1960s. Get ready for the award season battle of the Australian actresses playing princesses? [Peter Knegt]


“The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: His & Hers
(directed by Ned Benson)
Perhaps the most fascinating project of the fall is Ned Benson's feature debut as a writer and director, "The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: His." Or perhaps the most fascinating project is "The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Hers." Oh, shoot. Let's just call it a tie. After all, they're essentially the same film. Benson's script for "Eleanor Rigby" appeared on the Black List -- not a surprise, by any means, considering the film tells the same story from two different perspectives. Starring James McAvoy and Jessica Chastain as the doomed "him" and "her" of the films' titles, expect this to play some sort of festival this fall. Details are scant, but it has too many big names (William Hurt, Viola Davis and Bill Hader) to stay hidden for long. [Ben Travers]

"The Double" (directed by Richard Ayoade)
Actor/director Richard Ayoade's follow up to his sleeper-hit comedy "Submarine" sees him going into similar territory, featuring Jesse Eisenberg as a man whose life is thrown off of balance by the appearance of a doppelgänger. With "Submarine" having shown at Toronto in 2010, the festival seems like a sold fit for the film, which has not yet announced an official release date. Screening at Telluride right before may also be in the cards for the film, which co-stars Mia Wasikowska and Wallace Shawn. [Clint Holloway]

"An Enemy" and "Prisoners" (both directed by Denis Villeneuve).
It looks like the fall festival circuit could feature a lot of both Denis Villeneuve and Jake Gyllenhaal. French-Canadian director Denis Villeneuve ("Incendies") is doubling down with Jake for the former's English-language debuts "Prisoners" and "An Enemy." The first is a Black List project that has been kicking around since 2009 and has finally been given a release date for September 20th (meaning it's primed  to hit Toronto, especially given the director is Canadian). Also starring Hugh Jackman, Maria Bello, Terrance Howard, Viola Davis, Melissa Leo and Paul Dano, the film revolves around a carpenter named Keller Dover (Jackman) whose young daughter and friend are kidnapped. Though Detective Loki (Gyllenhaal) is assigned to the case, it is a matter of time before Dover takes matters into his own hands.  "An Enemy," meanwhile, is based on José Saramago's novel "The Double" (oddly enough the name of the previous film on his list) and follows a man who rents a movie to find that one of the minor characters is his exact double. Both men are played by Gyllenhaal as the dual characters' lives become intertwined. Like "Prisoners," the film boasts an impressive supporting cast, with Melanie Laurent, Isabella Rossellini, and Sarah Gadon co-starring. Will both debut in Toronto? They both seem like they're ready. [Julia Selinger]

"Enough Said" (directed by Nicole Holofcener)
It's been three years since Nicole Holofcener's lovely previous feature "Please Give" (though she's directed episodes of "Parks & Recreation" and "Enlightened" in between), and her latest -- as yet untitled -- has been good to go since the spring (it had very well received test screening back then). And while the director often is a Sundance staple, the timing seems right for Toronto this time around. If so, look for Catherine Keener (who has starred in all of her films), Toni Collette, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and the late James Gandolfini in the story of divorced woman who learns her new love interest is her new friend's ex-husband. [Peter Knegt]

"The Fifth Estate"
(directed by Bill Condon)
With its controversial subject matter and an impressive supporting cast, "The Fifth Estate" has been the subject of much anticipation. The film tells the tale of WikiLeaks co-founders Julian Assange and Daniel Domscheit-Berg, played by Benedict Cumberbatch and Daniel Bruhl. Cumberbatch in particular is sure to draw fans from his work in "Sherlock" and "Star Trek" (though we'll have to see what they think of his bleached blonde mop). The cast also includes Dan Stevens, Alicia Vikander, Carice Van Houten, Anthony Mackie, Stanley Tucci, Laura Linney and Peter Capaldi. The screenplay, penned by Josh Singer ("The West Wing"), is based on the books "Inside WikiLeaks: My Time With Julian Assange At The World's Most Dangerous Website" by Domscheit-Berg and "WikiLeaks: Inside Julian Assange's War On Secrecy" by British journalists David Leigh and Luke Harding. It's set for release in October, seemingly clinching it to launch a month earlier on the circuit.  [Julia Selinger]
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7 Comments

  • Souvlaki Space Station | July 23, 2013 4:01 AMReply

    Venice should look a little something like this:

    A Most Wanted Man (Anton Corbijn)
    Abuse of Weakness (Catherine Breillat)
    Amour Fou (Jessica Hausner)
    Captain Phillips (Paul Greengrass)
    Diana (Olivier Hirschbiegel)
    Diary of a Young Boy (Tsai Ming-liang)
    Eastern Boys (Robin Campillo)
    In Your Name (Marco Van Geffen)
    La foresta di ghiaccio (Claudio Noce)
    La jalousie (Philippe Garrel)
    Moebius (Kim ki-duk)
    Night Moves (Kelly Reichardt)
    Segui il vento (Peter del Monte)
    Twelve Years a Slave (Steve McQueen)
    Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer)
    Welcome to New York (Abel Ferrara)
    The Zero Theoreom (Terry Gilliam)

    Stephen Frears or Ralph Fiennes seem like solid bets for Closing Night, too.

  • Chris L. | June 25, 2013 3:03 AMReply

    A few others worth mentioning: Third Person (Haggis), The Invisible Woman (Ralph Fiennes), Can a Song Save Your Life? (John Carney), Therese (Charlie Stratton), The Trials of Cate McCall (Karen Moncrieff), Calvary (John Michael McDonagh), A Walk Among the Tombstones (Scott Frank), A Promise (Patrice Leconte). These vary widely in potential, but each does boast an interesting cast.

  • robert gray | June 22, 2013 11:33 AMReply

    The name is Scorsese, Martin Scorsese.

  • Max | June 21, 2013 10:37 PMReply

    Is there any chance of Andrew Levitas's "Lullaby" appearing at any festivals?

  • Kanerwa | June 20, 2013 3:21 PMReply

    The Rover has nothing to do with Mad Max,where's these comparison came from?

  • Archie Borders | June 20, 2013 2:51 PMReply

    I hope you'll see "Pleased to Meet Me" at one of the festivals. Really I do.

  • nothing | June 20, 2013 10:55 AMReply

    Trailer for Nymphomaniac is fake though.