Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.
by Bryce J. Renninger
January 15, 2013 1:11 PM
2 Comments
  • |

Film Aside, Can You Listen to the 'Les Miserables' Soundtrack On Its Own?


What songs still get it (or are maybe better from the film):

"Can You Hear the People Sing?"

Movie Version:

London Recording:

The spirit of community and revolution that is so important to the musical is on full display in the film's version of this one.

"Prologue"

Movie Version:

London Recording:

Say what you want about Russell Crowe's rock star voice, but the film's terrifying prologue, with Valjean working on the chain gang nearly drowning, is effective at being what it needs to be aurally commanding.

"On My Own"

Movie Version:

London Recording:

Grown-up Eponine always brings down the house as she gives up Marius, and Samantha Barks may have just made a career doing just that.

"Red and Black"

Movie Version:

London Recording:

The stage's mostly forgettable dude rallying cry is carried and made into something completely new by rising stars -- and heartthrobs -- Eddie Redmayne and Aaron Tveit.

You might also like:

2 Comments

  • rageoffstage | January 17, 2013 1:36 PMReply

    Thank you for putting all this together - we were thinking this would be an interesting comparison given that many people will no doubt buy the film soundtrack as a result of seeing the movie. We can't decide whether the Anne Hathaway version is more annoying with or without the visuals, though. Also worth noting that you are using the original London recording rather than the 10th anniversary 'dream cast' recording, which benefitted from the addition of Phillip Quast as Javert and Michael Maguire as Enjolras. That might have changed things a bit! Here's our take on the movie....http://rageoffstage.wordpress.com/2013/01/14/tom-hoopers-movie-puts-the-misery-back-into-les-miserables-and-takes-the-musical-out

  • HSM | January 16, 2013 7:57 AMReply

    I am so glad they made a good movie and not a karaoke film to sing along to. ;-) That was why Tom Hooper chose Russell Crowe despite what the critics say, the ability to act is much more important in the movie than on the stage where almost no one could see the actors' faces.