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Film Movement Acquires Italian Film 'Human Capital' Ahead of Its Tribeca Film Festival Premiere

By Ziyad Saadi | Indiewire April 11, 2014 at 12:12PM

It seems as though Italian filmmaker Paolo Virzi ("The First Beautiful Thing") is getting just the right amount of buzz for his latest feature "Human Capital." Just ahead of its North American premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival later this month, the film has just been acquired by Film Movement.
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"Human Capital."
"Human Capital."

It seems as though Italian filmmaker Paolo Virzi ("The First Beautiful Thing") is getting just the right amount of buzz for his latest feature "Human Capital." In advance of its North American premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival later this month, the film has just been acquired by Film Movement.

"Human Capital" follows the lives of two families, one middle-class and one very well-to-do and privileged, as their lives intertwine across social statuses when two of their children suddenly begin a relationship that leads to a tragic accident. "We love the movie's portrait of a society struggling with the same issues of economic inequality that we're seeing here in the U.S.," said Adley Gartenstein, co-president of Film Movement. "The film's unique structure and superb acting make it an incredibly exciting acquisition for Film Movement."

Read More: Film Movement's Genre Label RAM Releasing to Focus on Darker, Edgier Fare

Once "Human Capital" screens at Tribeca and a number of other festivals, the film will be released theatrically in early 2015 and subsequently on VOD and home video. 

Film Movement, which focuses on independent and foreign films, has also recently acquired Sundance World Cinema Grand Jury Award-winner "To Kill a Man" and "1,000 Times Good Night" starring Juliette Binoche, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Larry Mullen.

This article is related to: Human Capital, Paolo Virzì, 2014 Tribeca Film Festival, Acquisitions, News, Film Movement







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