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Honor Roll 2012: Kristen Stewart Goes 'On the Road' to Find Sex, Dancing and -- Just Maybe -- an Award

Photo of Jay A. Fernandez By Jay A. Fernandez | Indiewire December 20, 2012 at 12:44PM

With IFC Films opening the film Dec. 21, Stewart reveals how first reading the book at 14 sparked her search for the adventure in people, her ambivalent reaction to having sex scenes cut from the film and what playing Marylou taught her about how to be "motivated by the fears in life.”
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OK, but to play devil’s advocate: where are you going to go with your character in a “Snow White” sequel?

Oh, it’s gonna be fuckin’ amazing. No, I’m so excited about it, it’s crazy.

Can you give me a hint of where it goes?

I’m not allowed. The other day I said that there was a strong possibility that we’re going to make a sequel, and that’s very true, but everyone was like, “Whoa, stop talking about it.” So no, I’m totally not allowed to talk about it.

Snow White And The Huntsman Kristen Stewart

But it’s fair to say that there are ideas that have been discussed that totally justify it for you.

Oh my God. Fuck, yeah. Absolutely. And we’ve got a really amazing… [smiles] So, yeah. It’s all good. [laughs]

What’s it like watching yourself have sex? Putting aside the possibility that you have home recordings or anything?

Right. [laughs] Well, I wasn’t really having sex. To be honest, I think if you were to isolate the scenes, it’s fairly ridiculous watching yourself fake have sex. But within the movie, watching the movie, I do get so caught up in this one. I’ve seen it three times, and that’s not typical for me. I have to complete the process, I need to watch the movie at the end of it. But three times?

Why this one then?

I don’t know. Walter could have cut together a 24-hour movie. I watched the movie, and it’s funny, I remember those moments like they’re parts of my life. And that typically happens when you watch a movie, but this one’s strange just because I can’t identify any scene. There are parts, moments, where I don’t feel like I’m watching a movie, I feel like I’m watching a home video. And I know that sounds like crazy talk.

That’s also the way he shot it. It’s meant to be lived in.

100%. So it doesn’t feel that weird to me. I felt like watching “Welcome to the Rileys” was more weird. But that was the point — it was to be a little bit like, you didn’t really want to watch that.

Because in this one, Marylou’s enjoying it.

It’s fucking fun! Exactly. It’s definitely full of love, this one.

What’s your sense of awards campaigning? It must be a weird thing for someone in your position where there are companies trying to make money, and there’s a certain business aspect to this time of year and a movie like this. It’s probably the most important film IFC Films has ever released. That means for someone like you, you’re put out there to kind of peddle it. What’s your sense of your role in that piece of the process?

"Twilight"
"Twilight"

I would follow Walter anywhere. I’m so proud of him. I would peddle his stuff to anyone in the world. I feel like it makes total sense — standing next to Garrett and Walter and Sam and Tom and everything, like when we were at Cannes, that makes so much sense to me. I’ve never felt stronger. I really like talking about the movie, so doing press for it is actually kind of fun — I’m not bullshitting.

It doesn’t feel like a different kind of press than something like “Twilight?”

It does, it’s just a little less monotonous because people actually want to have conversations about it.

Rather than, “Oh, my God, you’re Bella… I can’t breathe.”

[laughs] Yeah, exactly. Or like, “How is it to be a vampire?”

How many times would you say you’ve heard that one?

Honestly? Hundreds. I’m not kidding.

This article is related to: Kristen Stewart, On The Road, Awards, Honor Roll 2012, Interviews, Interviews







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