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How Your Film Can Put Pinterest to Work

By Sheri Candler | Indiewire March 27, 2012 at 2:59PM

Is Pinterest just another social networking site or is it the wave of the future? I know, collective groan. But here is why Pinterest might be a site you should consider using for your production.
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We're big fans of the Tribeca Institute's Future of Film blog and editor Chris Dorr has kindly agreed to let us republish some of our favorite posts. This one's by marketing strategist Sheri Candler, who makes a compelling argument as to why indie filmmakers need to pay attention to Pinterest.

Pinterest logo

Is Pinterest just another social networking site or is it the wave of the future?

I know, collective groan: "Yet another social network to keep up with?" Seems like there is a new one born every minute, and many of them fail to get off the ground. But here is why Pinterest might be a site you should consider using for your production.

• In just one month (December 2011-January 2012), Pinterest saw traffic increase over 155%, and over the last 6 months, traffic increased by 4000%. As of this month, they had over 11 million unique visitors to the site and over 10 million registered users from all over the world.

• Statistics show Pinterest drives more referral traffic on the Web than Google+, YouTube, Redditand LinkedIn combined. The beauty of pinning photos/videos is they link back to websites, thus driving traffic. They are no follow links, so it doesn't help with SEO, but any link that drives traffic to a site is good for awareness and conversion.

• Mainly, the site now attracts women in the age range 25-44 who love fashion, home decorating and family related products. As it gains more of a following, this is bound to change. Still, if that is a target demographic for your film...

• Activities are based on images so rather than having to write a lot, you can simply post photo collections and they don't even have to be your own photos! I think this is the highly attractive thing about Pinterest; in fact, I am hearing about Pinterest addiction. Users typically spend 11 minutes on the site each visit. User scanning pictures is a lot more enjoyable than scanning status updates onFacebook clearly. Plus there is no EdgeRank to deal with. Once someone decides to follow your boards, they continually see new additions you make in their stream whenever they log in.

• The key for users doesn't seem to be gaining followers, but gaining repins meaning they want to have people think what they pin is cool (or hot, or whatever). They strive to be INFLUENCERS and that is exactly the people you want to find and connect with. Because people can follow boards they find interesting, it is possible to have many more followers on your boards than you do on your account profile.

• It integrates with your other social accounts like Facebook and Twitter and hopefully Google Plus is coming. There are embed badge widgets you can install on your website to integrate all of your social channels. Word of caution, at the moment the site only connects to Facebook PROFILES -- not business or professional pages, so you probably shouldn’t opt to sign in with Facebook if you are using this for your film, just sign in with your email and don’t connect to Facebook. If you want to tie Pinterest to your Twitter account, make sure it is the one you use for your film and when G+ comes online, make sure you have signed up using a gmail account for the production, not for your personal gmail account. However, other users can sign in with their social accounts and things they pin show up in their Facebook or Twitter stream, very handy for word of mouth to be spread about you and your film.

This article is related to: Pinterest, Marketing





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