Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Steve Carell Redefined His Career By Surprising Everyone in 'Foxcatcher' Steve Carell Redefined His Career By Surprising Everyone in 'Foxcatcher' Watch: Ellar Coltrane on the 'Brutal' Experience of Watching 'Boyhood' After Living It Watch: Ellar Coltrane on the 'Brutal' Experience of Watching 'Boyhood' After Living It Mortem Tyldum Explains Why Alan Turing Was the Right Subject For His First English-Language Film Mortem Tyldum Explains Why Alan Turing Was the Right Subject For His First English-Language Film Why Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’ is a Great, Unexpected Awards Season Frontrunner Why Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’ is a Great, Unexpected Awards Season Frontrunner Watch: Patricia Arquette on Stripping Away Ego to Get to the Heart of 'Boyhood' 
Watch: Patricia Arquette on Stripping Away Ego to Get to the Heart of 'Boyhood' 'Whiplash' Breakout Miles Teller Has Officially Arrived 'Whiplash' Breakout Miles Teller Has Officially Arrived Michael Keaton Dug Deep to Deliver the Best Performance of His Career in 'Birdman' Michael Keaton Dug Deep to Deliver the Best Performance of His Career in 'Birdman' Mark Ruffalo Explains Why Dave Schultz Was One of the Most Complex Characters He's Ever Played Mark Ruffalo Explains Why Dave Schultz Was One of the Most Complex Characters He's Ever Played Keira Knightley on 'The Imitation Game' and Why Awards Matter Keira Knightley on 'The Imitation Game' and Why Awards Matter Katherine Waterston On the Good and Bad of Working With Paul Thomas Anderson Katherine Waterston On the Good and Bad of Working With Paul Thomas Anderson Emma Stone Proved She Can Do It All in 2014 Emma Stone Proved She Can Do It All in 2014 Jon Stewart is Off to a Strong Start with Directorial Debut 'Rosewater' Jon Stewart is Off to a Strong Start with Directorial Debut 'Rosewater' Awards Spotlight: Don't Be Surprised When J.K. Simmons Takes Home Oscar Awards Spotlight: Don't Be Surprised When J.K. Simmons Takes Home Oscar Jessica Chastain Proved She's a Total Chameleon in 2014 Jessica Chastain Proved She's a Total Chameleon in 2014 Laura Poitras on 'CITIZENFOUR,' The Most Dangerous Work She's Ever Done Laura Poitras on 'CITIZENFOUR,' The Most Dangerous Work She's Ever Done Jake Gyllenhaal On Doing Very Bad Things in 'Nightcrawler' Jake Gyllenhaal On Doing Very Bad Things in 'Nightcrawler' Channing Tatum Explains Why It Took Him Eight Years to Have the ‘Balls’ for ‘Foxcatcher’ Channing Tatum Explains Why It Took Him Eight Years to Have the ‘Balls’ for ‘Foxcatcher’ Ethan Hawke Didn't Know That Richard Linklater Would Bring 'Boyhood' Home So Well Ethan Hawke Didn't Know That Richard Linklater Would Bring 'Boyhood' Home So Well Jack O'Connell Explains What It’s Like to Work For Angelina Jolie Jack O'Connell Explains What It’s Like to Work For Angelina Jolie 'Red Army' Director Gabe Polsky Reveals the Story of Soviet Hockey 'Red Army' Director Gabe Polsky Reveals the Story of Soviet Hockey How Felicity Jones is Getting Noticed This Awards Season How Felicity Jones is Getting Noticed This Awards Season Edward Norton Goes Full-Blown For Alejandro González Iñárritu in 'Birdman' Edward Norton Goes Full-Blown For Alejandro González Iñárritu in 'Birdman' How Eddie Redmayne Transformed His Body and Mind to Become Stephen Hawking How Eddie Redmayne Transformed His Body and Mind to Become Stephen Hawking Oscar Isaac Explains How 'A Most Violent Year' Fits With His Other Roles Oscar Isaac Explains How 'A Most Violent Year' Fits With His Other Roles Timothy Spall Almost Went Mad to Play 'Mr. Turner' For Mike Leigh Timothy Spall Almost Went Mad to Play 'Mr. Turner' For Mike Leigh 'Gone Girl' Composer Atticus Ross: How to Write a Score Without Seeing the Film 'Gone Girl' Composer Atticus Ross: How to Write a Score Without Seeing the Film How to Play James Brown, By Chadwick Boseman: Study the Man, Listen to Drake How to Play James Brown, By Chadwick Boseman: Study the Man, Listen to Drake Chris Rock on Why Making 'Top Five' Was a No-Brainer Chris Rock on Why Making 'Top Five' Was a No-Brainer Steve James and Chaz Ebert Tackled 'Life Itself' Steve James and Chaz Ebert Tackled 'Life Itself' Bennett Miller Explains Why He Had to Make 'Foxcatcher' Bennett Miller Explains Why He Had to Make 'Foxcatcher' How Do You Roll Six Movies Into One? 'Wild Tales' Director Damian Szifron Explains How Do You Roll Six Movies Into One? 'Wild Tales' Director Damian Szifron Explains How Rosario Dawson Stole the Show From Chris Rock in 'Top Five' How Rosario Dawson Stole the Show From Chris Rock in 'Top Five' Alan Hicks: From Drummer-Surfer to Oscar-Shortlist Filmmaker Alan Hicks: From Drummer-Surfer to Oscar-Shortlist Filmmaker Alejandro González Iñárritu: 'Birdman' Could Have Been 'so wrong' Alejandro González Iñárritu: 'Birdman' Could Have Been 'so wrong' Amir Bar-Lev Likes to Make People a Little Uncomfortable Amir Bar-Lev Likes to Make People a Little Uncomfortable

indieWIRE INTERVIEW | Dreaming Kawabatas: "House of Sleeping Beauties" Director Vadim Glowna

By Indiewire | Indiewire November 13, 2008 at 11:40AM

Based on Yasunari Kawabata's novel, Vadim Glowna's "House of Sleeping Beauties" follows Edmond, a man in his sixties whose wife has recently passed away, and who is told about a secret establishment where men can spend an entire night in bed alongside beautiful, sleeping young women who never awaken. The German film is being released stateside by First Run Features, and opens at the Quad Cinema in New York this Friday, November 14. indieWIRE talked to Glowna about the film and its U.S. release.
0

Based on Yasunari Kawabata's novel, Vadim Glowna's "House of Sleeping Beauties" follows Edmond, a man in his sixties whose wife has recently passed away, and who is told about a secret establishment where men can spend an entire night in bed alongside beautiful, sleeping young women who never awaken. The German film is being released stateside by First Run Features, and opens at the Quad Cinema in New York this Friday, November 14. indieWIRE talked to Glowna about the film and its U.S. release.

What initially attracted you to filmmaking, and how has that interest evolved during your career?

My first feature film was "Desperado City" about my youth in Hamburg-St.Pauli where I grew up. It was a hommage to these people in my beginning about that redlight-district, the prostitutes and pimps, the harbour and the Beatles, the gangsters and the kids who learned their first important lessons on the street. The film won 1981 the "Camera d'Or" at the Cannes Film Festival and many others. My second film "Nothing Left To Lose" was shot 1983 in El Paso, Texas. About two Jewish families who escaped Nazi-Germany and got stuck somewhere in the desert and never made it to California.

As an actor, I appeared in more than 160 films. In the US the most popular and known film might be "Steiner - The Cross of Iron" by Sam Peckinpah. He was a great master to me and I learned a lot working with him. Maybe in some ways I'm obsessed like him to do films and live.

As an actor you are challenged with every part you get offered. One of the most difficult roles I did was Johann Sebastian Bach in "My Name is Bach" or "Jagged Harmonies". I'm not a musician so I had to learn instruments the hard way. A coach teached me for more than half a year to learn piano, spinett, organ and flute. Day by day because I was so ambitious to make possible that the camera could pan from my fingers to my face and back to give a convincing impression that I handle the instrument really by myself.

How did the idea for "House of Sleeping Beauties" come about?

A friend gave me Kawabatas' novel "House of the Sleeping Beauties" to read. I immediately thought what a strange and touching story about eroticism and death, about love and guilt, a desire for forgivingness and redemption, about transitoriness and loneliness. A subject so rich in all human facettes. I was dreaming along in the character and fate of Edmond.

Please elaborate a bit on your approach to making the film...

When I told Raymond Tarabay, my business partner and managing director, the story, he loved it and agreed and we decided to work on the film right away. From the idea to the first day of shooting it took only 2 and a half months. I didn't ask anybody to coproduce because I knew people in the business would say I'm crazy again. I put my own money in it.

It was clear that I couldn't translate Kawabatas novel one-to-one into a European way of viewing or feeling. Japan is a very specific cultural circle of culture with a different grown society. So I renounced to take most of Kawabatas memories und put instead stories and episodes of my own life into the script.

It was daring and I wouldn't recommend other filmmakers to go the same way. But when you are so convinced of what you have dreamed of then you have no way out then you have to do it, also to convince an audience.

What were some of the biggest challenges you faced in developing the film?

One big challenge was the financing but I was lucky to gather most of my friends and technicians I worked with in the past for little money or on deferrement. Another problem was to find the cast of the young beauties. Because the young women had to expose themselves completely. First I was afraid I had to cast ladies from the porn business but then it turned out that a lot of actor students were interested because they liked the script and they trusted me. These young ladies are working now on stage and in films in Germany and internationally.

What is your next project?

Right now I'm working on a project called "Che is Alive". The killing of Guevara by the CIA in the Bolivian jungle 1967 was a fake, they needed him for other purposes.

This article is related to: World Cinema, Interviews






Check out Indiewire on LockerDome on LockerDome



Awards Season Spotlight

Contender Conversations

Indiewire celebrates the best and brightest from Independent film, Hollywood, and foreign cinema.

More