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iW NEWS | "Brothers" and "Good" Bookend 44th Chicago Film Fest

By Indiewire | Indiewire October 16, 2008 at 5:13AM

Rian Johnson's "The Brothers Bloom" starring Rachel Weisz, Adrian Brody, Mark Ruffalo and Rinko Kikuchi will open the 2008 Chicago Interntional Film Festival tonight (Thursday) in the windy city. The 44th edition of the festival takes place October 16 - 29. Vicente Amorim's "Good" with Viggo Mortensen about a man who explores his personal circumstances in a novel advocating compassionate euthanasia will close the fest. Highlights of the festival include Gael Garcia Bernal's "Deficit," and Alex Rivera's "Sleep Dealer," screening in Chicago's Cinema of the Americas section as well as Lance Hammer's "Ballast" and Barry Jenkins' "Medicine for Melancholy," screening in the Black Perspectives sidebar. For more information and a full line up, visit the Chicago International Film Festival's website. [Brian Brooks]
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Rian Johnson's "The Brothers Bloom" starring Rachel Weisz, Adrian Brody, Mark Ruffalo and Rinko Kikuchi will open the 2008 Chicago Interntional Film Festival tonight (Thursday) in the windy city. The 44th edition of the festival takes place October 16 - 29. Vicente Amorim's "Good" with Viggo Mortensen about a man who explores his personal circumstances in a novel advocating compassionate euthanasia will close the fest. Highlights of the festival include Gael Garcia Bernal's "Deficit," and Alex Rivera's "Sleep Dealer," screening in Chicago's Cinema of the Americas section as well as Lance Hammer's "Ballast" and Barry Jenkins' "Medicine for Melancholy," screening in the Black Perspectives sidebar. For more information and a full line up, visit the Chicago International Film Festival's website. [Brian Brooks]

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