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iW NEWS | Sony Classics Brings "Synecdoche, New York" Stateside

By Indiewire | Indiewire July 24, 2008 at 7:05AM

U.S. rights to Charlie Kaufman's directorial debut, "Synecdoche, New York" have been picked up by Sony Pictures Classics, the company confirmed today in a deal brokered by UTA from Sidney Kimmel Entertainment. The film screened in official competition at the 2008 Cannes International Film Festival. Academy Award winner Philip Seymour Hoffman plays theater director Caden Cotard's who views his life in Schenectady, New York as bleak. His wife Adele (Catherine Keener) has left him to pursue her painting in Berlin, taking their young daughter Olive with her. A new relationship with the alluringly candid Hazel (Samantha Morton) has prematurely run aground, and a mysterious condition is systematically shutting down each of his body's autonomic functions. Worried about the transience of his life, he moves his theater company to a warehouse in New York City. SPC plans an October release. [Brian Brooks]
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U.S. rights to Charlie Kaufman's directorial debut, "Synecdoche, New York" have been picked up by Sony Pictures Classics, the company confirmed today in a deal brokered by UTA from Sidney Kimmel Entertainment. The film screened in official competition at the 2008 Cannes International Film Festival. Academy Award winner Philip Seymour Hoffman plays theater director Caden Cotard's who views his life in Schenectady, New York as bleak. His wife Adele (Catherine Keener) has left him to pursue her painting in Berlin, taking their young daughter Olive with her. A new relationship with the alluringly candid Hazel (Samantha Morton) has prematurely run aground, and a mysterious condition is systematically shutting down each of his body's autonomic functions. Worried about the transience of his life, he moves his theater company to a warehouse in New York City. SPC plans an October release. [Brian Brooks]

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