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Kathryn Bigelow Triumphs At DGAs

Photo of Peter Knegt By Peter Knegt | Indiewire January 31, 2010 at 7:03AM

Kathryn Bigelow was awarded the Directors Guild of America's top honor tonight at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles for her work on "The Hurt Locker." The award had been seen as a closely rivalled battle between Bigelow and her ex-husband, "Avatar" director James Cameron. In winning, Bigelow becomes the first woman ever to win the DGA's top honor, and substantially increases suspicion she is about to do the same at the Academy Awards.
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Kathryn Bigelow was awarded the Directors Guild of America's top honor tonight at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles for her work on "The Hurt Locker." The award had been seen as a closely rivalled battle between Bigelow and her ex-husband, "Avatar" director James Cameron. In winning, Bigelow becomes the first woman ever to win the DGA's top honor, and substantially increases suspicion she is about to do the same at the Academy Awards.

The DGA Award traditionally been a near perfect barometer for the Best Director Academy Award. Only six times since the DGA Award's inception has the DGA Award winner not won the Academy Award; in 1968 (Carol Reed won the Oscar for directing Oliver!); 1972 (Bob Fosse won the Oscar for directing Cabaret); 1985 (Sydney Pollack won the Oscar for directing Out of Africa); 1995 (Mel Gibson won for directing Braveheart); 2000 (Steven Soderbergh won the Oscar for directing Traffic); and 2002 (Roman Polanski won the Oscar for directing The Pianist).

The complete list of winners, including the documentary winner, is below:

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film
Kathryn Bigelow, The Hurt Locker

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary
Louie Psihoyos, The Cove

This article is related to: The Hurt Locker





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