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"King's Speech" Leads British Independent Film Award Nominations

Photo of Peter Knegt By Peter Knegt | Indiewire November 1, 2010 at 1:54AM

Tom Hooper's "The King's Speech" led the nominations for the 13th annual Moet British Independent Film Awards, which were announced this morning at St Martins Lane in London. The film garnered eight nominations, including best film, best director, best screenplay, and acting nominations for Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, Geoffrey Rush and Guy Pearce. In the best film category, it was nominated alongside Chris Morris's "Four Lions," Matthew Vaughn's "Kick-Ass," Gareth Edwards's "Monsters" and Mark Romanek's "Never Let Me Go" - each of which took multiple nominations themselves.
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Tom Hooper's "The King's Speech" led the nominations for the 13th annual Moet British Independent Film Awards, which were announced this morning at St Martins Lane in London. The film garnered eight nominations, including best film, best director, best screenplay, and acting nominations for Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, Geoffrey Rush and Guy Pearce. In the best film category, it was nominated alongside Chris Morris's "Four Lions," Matthew Vaughn's "Kick-Ass," Gareth Edwards's "Monsters" and Mark Romanek's "Never Let Me Go" - each of which took multiple nominations themselves.

The nominations certainly made clear what a strong year 2010 has been for British independent filmmaking. Beyond the noted films, others finding numerous notices included Rowan Joffe's "Brighton Rock," Nigel Cole's "Made in Dagenham," and Mike Leigh's "Another Year."

"Dagenham" and "Year" join "The King's Speech" as the three films represented here that seem most like to play a role in the American awards circuit. Oddly enough, the former two were snubbed in the best film category for the likes of "Kick-Ass" - a film that found a rather mixed response. The omission of "Another Year" is perhaps the most glaring, as it additionally was snubbed in the best screenplay category, where "Dagenham" did manage a nomination. This is not the first time the awards have excluded Mike Leigh. In 2008, his "Happy-Go-Lucky" did not get nominated for best film or best director, and its lauded lead actress Sally Hawkins bizarrely lost her award to Vera Farmiga for "The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas."

Hawkins was nominated again this year for "Dagenham," while "Another Year"'s cast Jim Broadbent, Ruth Sheen and Lesley Manville all received acting nominations as well. Except the BIFAs placed Manville in the supporting category, which is interesting considering the debate surrounding her category placement for the Oscars, where she is definitely the film's best bet at a nomination and is currently being campaigned in the lead category.

One film that the BIFAs did not overlook was Clio Barnard's inventive documentary "The Arbor," which just last week won two awards at the BFI London Film Festival. The directorial debut of artist Barnard, the focuses on the life of Bradford playwright Andrea Dunbar. With a commission from Artangel, Barnard spent two years interviewing Dunbar's family and friends, and these personal accounts formed the backbone to the film, which straggles the line between narrative and documentary filmmaking. "The Arbor" received six nominations, including best documentary, best debut director and best actress Manjinder Virk.

"Arbor" as well as noted films "Monsters" and "Four Lions" (which picked up six and four nominations, respectively) are probably the films that stand to gain the most from the attention they received from the awards. "Monsters" opened Stateside this weekend, while "Four Lions" is opening this Friday (check out Eric Kohn's review for indieWIRE). "The Arbor," meanwhile, is set for U.S. release next April care of Strand Releasing.

The winners will be announced at a ceremony which will take place on Sunday, December 5th at the Old Billingsgate in London and will be hosted for the sixth year by James Nesbitt. They are decided by an independent jury comprised of "leading professionals and talent from the British film industry." The Jury for 2010 will include: Mags Arnold (Editor), Finola Dwyer (Producer), Matthew Goode (Actor), Matt Greenhalgh (Writer), Andy Harries (Producer), Gemma Jones (Actress), David Mackenzie (Director), James Marsh (Director), Hannah McGill (Writer, Critic & Festival Programmer), Sean Pertwee (Actor), Jamie Sives (Actor), Jason Solomons (Film Critic), Gary Williamson (Production Designer). Last year, Duncan Jones' "Moon" ended up winning best film at the awards.

The full list of nominations is below.


BEST BRITISH INDEPENDENT FILM
Four Lions
Kick-Ass
The King's Speech
Monsters
Never Let Me Go


BEST DIRECTOR
Mike Leigh - Another Year
Matthew Vaughn - Kick-Ass
Tom Hooper - The King's Speech
Gareth Edwards - Monsters
Mark Romanek - Never Let Me Go


THE DOUGLAS HICKOX AWARD [BEST DEBUT DIRECTOR]
Debs Gardner Paterson - Africa United
Clio Barnard - The Arbor
Rowan Joffe - Brighton Rock
Chris Morris - Four Lions
Gareth Edwards - Monsters


BEST SCREENPLAY
Jesse Armstrong, Sam Bain, Simon Blackwell, Christopher Morris - Four Lions
Jane Goldman & Matthew Vaughn - Kick-Ass
David Seidler - The King's Speech
William Ivory - Made In Dagenham
Alex Garland - Never Let Me Go


BEST ACTRESS
Manjinder Virk - The Arbor
Ruth Sheen - Another Year
Andrea Riseborough - Brighton Rock
Sally Hawkins - Made In Dagenham
Carey Mulligan - Never Let Me Go


BEST ACTOR
Jim Broadbent - Another Year
Riz Ahmed - Four Lions
Colin Firth - The King's Speech
Scoot McNairy - Monsters
Aidan Gillen - Treacle Junior


BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Lesley Manville - Another Year
Helena Bonham Carter - The King's Speech
Rosamund Pike - Made In Dagenham
Keira Knightley - Never Let Me Go
Tamsin Greig - Tamara Drewe


BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Kayvan Novak - Four Lions
Guy Pearce - The King's Speech
Geoffrey Rush - The King's Speech
Bob Hoskins - Made In Dagenham
Andrew Garfield - Never Let Me Go


MOST PROMISING NEWCOMER
Manjinder Virk - The Arbor
Andrea Riseborough - Brighton Rock
Tom Hughes - Cemetery Junction
Joanne Froggatt - In Our Name
Conor McCarron - Neds


BEST ACHIEVEMENT IN PRODUCTION
The Arbor
In Our Name
Monsters
Skeletons
Streetdance 3D


RAINDANCE AWARD
Brilliant Love
Jackboots On Whitehall
Legacy
Son Of Babylon
Treacle Junior


BEST TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT
The Arbor - Sound - Tim Barker
Brighton Rock - Cinematography - John Mathieson
The Illusionist - Animation - Sylvain Chomet
The King's Speech - Production Design - Eve Stewart
Monsters - Visual Effects - Gareth Edwards


BEST DOCUMENTARY
The Arbor
Enemies of the People
Exit Through the Gift Shop
Fire In Babylon
Waste Land


BEST BRITISH SHORT
Baby
Photograph Of Jesus
Sign Language
Sis
The Road Home


BEST FOREIGN FILM
Dogtooth
I Am Love
A Prophet
The Secret In Their Eyes
Winter's Bone

This article is related to: Monsters







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