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Kino Lorber Takes 'You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet' Ahead of New York Film Festival Premiere

Photo of Peter Knegt By Peter Knegt | Indiewire September 25, 2012 at 3:03PM

Kino Lorber has acquired all U.S. Rights to Alan Resnais' "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet" ahead of its North American premiere at the 50th New York Film Festival on October 2nd.
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"You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet!"
"You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet!"

Kino Lorber has acquired all U.S. Rights to Alan Resnais' "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet" ahead of its North American premiere at the 50th New York Film Festival on October 2nd.

Kino Lorber CEO Richard Lorber negotiated the deal with Vanessa Saal, VP International Sales at STUDIOCANAL.

READ MORE: CANNES REVIEW: Alain Resnais' 'You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet!' is an Uneven Throwback to His Best Work

The film will be released in all major markets in early 2013.

The full press release below:

New York, NY - September 25, 2012 - Kino Lorber is proud to announce the acquisition of all U.S. rights to Alain Resnais' YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET, a beautiful and poetic ensemble film about love and theater from the acclaimed director of LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD and HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR - as well as the recently released WILD GRASS.
 
The rights have been acquired from STUDIOCANAL, who co-produced the film and manage its international sales.
 
An official selection of the upcoming 50th New York Film Festival, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET features an impressive cast that includes some of the most acclaimed names in French (and international) cinema. Among them are: Mathieu Amalric (Cosmopolis), Pierre Arditi (Private Fears in Public Spaces), Sabine Azema (Wild Grass), Hippolyte Girardot (Lady Chatterley), Anne Consigny (A Christmas Tale), Michel Piccoli (Habemus Papam) and Lambert Wilson (Of Gods and Men), to name a few.
 
The film is set to have its North American Premiere on October 2, 2012, at The 50th New York Film Festival; Kino Lorber will release YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET in all major markets in early 2013.  

Here's the official NYFF desciption of the film:

Based on two works by the playwright Jean Anouilh, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET opens with a who's-who of French acting royalty being summoned to the reading of a late playwright's last will and testament. There, the playwright (Denis Podalydès) appears on a TV screen from beyond the grave and asks his erstwhile collaborators to evaluate a recording of an experimental theater company performing his Eurydice-a play they themselves all appeared in over the years. But as the video unspools, instead of watching passively, these seasoned thespians begin acting out the text alongside their youthful avatars, looking back into the past rather like mythic Orpheus himself.

Gorgeously shot by cinematographer Eric Gautier on stylized sets that recall the French poetic realism of the 1930s, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET is an alternately wry and wistful valentine to actors and the art of performance from a director long fascinated by the intersection of life, theater and cinema." (The 50th New York Film Festival; The Film Society of Lincoln Center).

Kino Lorber CEO Richard Lorber negotiated the deal with Vanessa Saal, VP International Sales at STUDIOCANAL. He commented:

We are exceptionally pleased to bring Alain Resnais' latest and smartest cinematic confection to American audiences. Full of surprises, wit, and poignancy, YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET is a truly astonishing work from a legendary director (who's almost 90) that reveals new possibilities for the art of cinema. We believe this aptly titled film will assume its place as a classic of tomorrow while very much delighting audiences today.

This article is related to: New York Film Festival , Acquisitions, You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet, Alain Resnais, Kino Lorber





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