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Lincoln Center Film Society Set For 2005 Scanners NY Video Festival

Lincoln Center Film Society Set For 2005 Scanners NY Video Festival

by Brian Brooks









A scene from "Cop Festival Reloaded," screening at Scanners: the 2005 New York Video Festival. Image provided by the Film Society of Lincoln Center.

Re-branded this year as Scanners: the 2005 New York Video Festival, the Film Society of Lincoln Center will present the 12th edition of the event, formerly known simply as the New York Video Festival, July 27-31. The festival's line up includes an eclectic mix of offerings, including programs devoted to 2004 Turner Prize winner Jeremy Deller and a complete two-program retrospective of the video work of photographer Robert Frank. "Pink Films," a look at the Japanese video soft-porn industry, will get a viewing, with both a behind-the-scenes documentary and the U.S. premiere of a new work, with director in attendance. The event is co-presented with 2wice Magazine.

Japanese director Shinozaki Makoto's "Cop Festival" and "Cop Festival Reloaded" is a series of shot-on-video tongue-in-cheek cop-operas directed quickly and cheaply by notable Japanese directors, following three simple rules: the protagonist must be a cop, the maximum running time is ten minutes, and there must be at least one "gag" per minute. The pieces have been assembled into several compilations, each screened with success in independent cinemas in Japan and a few international festivals. The New York premiere of "Cop Festival" and "Cop Festival Reloaded" takes place Wednesday, July 27 and Saturday July 30 respectively.

Also having its New York debut is Damon Packard's "Reflections of Evil," described in a release as a "fear and loathing of modern L.A.'s toxic, violence-infested streets as it follows in the stumbling footsteps of its hapless, bloated protagonist, who is seemingly afflicted with schizophrenia, Tourette's syndrome, a compulsive-eating disorder, and demonic possession."

In other programs, Scanners will host "Animate," a program of nearly a dozen works from around the world, while "2005 Video Show: Music to My Eyes" includes a selection of videos from Armond White, including Jay-Z and Mark Romanek to Spike Jonze and Ludacris to Kate Bush and Joseph Kahn. "Each video demonstrates aesthetics and politics, art and soul can co-exist," explained White in a release.

Making its world premiere is American and Swiss production, "Aristide: And the Endless Revolution" by Nicolas Rossier. According to the fest, "the documentary pursues the truth behind the coup -- the thirty-third such event in Haiti's bloody history -- that led to the forced removal and exile of Haiti's democratically elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. In this twisted journey of political intrigues, gun-toting rebels, and economic fiascos, the great tragedy is that of democracy being massacred."

From China and The Netherlands, director Yang Ting Yuen will have the U.S. premiere of his "Yang Ban Xi: The 8 Models." The film explores the propaganda operas of the Cultural Revolution, which replaced the Peking Opera, known as the Yang Ban Xi. The only culture allowed in China for 10 years, the model works were pure propaganda told in beautiful images, incorporating the most modern techniques of cinematography, song and dance. Yang Ting Yuen revisits the people who created and performed in the Yang Ban Xi operas and speaks with members of the younger generation in China today.

From Japan comes the New York premiere of "Pink Ribbon," by Kenjiro Fuji. The film chronicles the history of the Japanese sex-film industry and its pink movies with rare clips, interviews, and behind-the-scenes footage. Because of "explicit" scenes, only viewers over 18 will be permitted.

[ For more information, and a full line up, please visit http://www.filmlinc.com. ]

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