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Magnet Acquires Critic's Week Title "Rubber"

Photo of Peter Knegt By Peter Knegt | Indiewire May 20, 2010 at 4:17AM

Magnet Releasing, the genre arm of Magnolia Pictures, announced today that it has acquired US rights to "Rubber", which is currently screening as part of Cannes Critic's Week. Directed by Quentin Dupieux ("Steak," "Nonfilm"), the film tells the story of Robert, an inanimate tire (yes, a tire) that has been abandoned in the desert, and suddenly and inexplicably comes to life. As Robert roams thelandscape, he discovers that he possesses "telepathic powers that give him the ability to destroy anything he wishes without having to move."
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Magnet Releasing, the genre arm of Magnolia Pictures, announced today that it has acquired US rights to "Rubber", which is currently screening as part of Cannes Critic's Week. Directed by Quentin Dupieux ("Steak," "Nonfilm"), the film tells the story of Robert, an inanimate tire (yes, a tire) that has been abandoned in the desert, and suddenly and inexplicably comes to life. As Robert roams thelandscape, he discovers that he possesses "telepathic powers that give him the ability to destroy anything he wishes without having to move."

"Robert the tire has to be the most unforgettable villain of the decade," said Magnet SVP Tom Quinn, in a statement. "Quentin Dupieux is a crazy genius."

Quinn negotiated the deal with Elle Driver's Eva Diederix and Adeline Fontan Tessaur.

Eric Kohn reviewed the film for indieWIRE earlier this week, saying: "Even with its bizarre satiric perspective on the nature of the viewing experience, "Rubber" does begin to wear out its welcome around the sixty minute mark, but you can't blame Dupieux for giving it a shot. The more overly ambitious aspects of the movie are also the parts that make it fundamentally hilarious."

The film currently has a "B" average on criticWIRE.

This article is related to: Festivals, Acquisitions







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