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'Mansome' Director Morgan Spurlock Talks VOD Vs Theatrical and Why Christopher J. Christie Needs to Lose Some Weight

Photo of Nigel M Smith By Nigel M Smith | Indiewire July 31, 2012 at 10:51AM

Documentary funnyman (and Academy Award nominee) Morgan Spurlock has had a tough run of late in theaters. Ever since his debut "Super Size Me" become a high-grossing indie phenomenon (it made North of $11 million domestically), Spurlock has seen his theatrical stock drop with each subsequent release.
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"Mansome"
FilmBuff "Mansome"

Now on to "Mansome." It struck me while watching it that the film's timely given the upcoming presidential election. So much focus is placed on how the male candidates look. Obama's been pictured shirtless countless times, while Romney's hair has also gotten its fair share of attention.

That is the power of TV. I think we live in a time now when how we look completely matters. Do I think we’ll ever see like a beast type guy elected President? I think Chris Christie’s going to have to find a treadmill if he actually wants to think that’s a reality. I think that we live in a time where how you see yourself, how you take care of yourself matters. I think that’s just where we are.

In following it up, do you plan to document the female antithesis to this?

Well, let’s wait and see how these VOD numbers turn out [laughs].

So what is next for you? The web's been hyping up this mystery narrative project you’ve supposedly already begun shooting or start shooting soon.

I was just on the phone with the writer for an hour and a half literally before I spoke to you!

So what can you tell me about it, if anything?

I can tell you I just talked to the writer for an hour and a half about the re-write we’re doing right now. I thought I could tell you that!

"Do I think we’ll ever see like a beast type guy elected President? I think Chris Christie’s going to have to find a treadmill if he actually wants to think that’s a reality."

Why so secretive?

Just because I don’t really like putting things out there until they’re like 100% happening, you know? When this thing is like 100% full board, train’s leaving the station, then you’ll hear what the whole thing is. But right now, it’s a film I’ve been attached to. It's coming up on four years now. Narratives take their own time and the last thing I want to do is completely change it.

You’re known for your funny, wisecracking ways. Can we expect it to be a comedy?

I think there’ll be funny moments in the film, but I don’t think you’ll look at the film as being a comedy. Like I remember when I first started getting sent scripts after "Super Size Me," and I was getting sent things like a “Revenge of the Nerds” remake or a Deuce Bigalow movie. Those were not the types of movies I wanted to make. And then finally when “Thank You for Smoking” came out, I was like, this is the exact type of world I want to be living in.

We got attached to another one of Christopher Buckley's [author of "Thank You For Smoking"] books, “Little Green Men." I thought it was a great book, but then the script came along for this other film and it made so much more sense.

You've done so much during the four years you've been fine tuning your narrative debut. What have you learned working as a documentary filmmaker and producer, that you will apply to your first fictional feature?

The biggest thing is hire people that are so much smarter and so much better than you, and are the best at what they do. Whether it be the actors or the set decorators or whoever it may be, all those people are people are so much more skilled than I could ever hope to be in any of those fields. All I can do is focus on the task at hand.

What can we expect from you next, documentary wise?

Right now is the first time in three-and-a-half years we’ve not had a film in any type of like active production or post. There’s some stuff we’re developing right now but so for me, the next doc I have probably won’t come out for at least a year-and-half. My next doc should come out in 2014.

This article is related to: Interviews, Morgan Spurlock, Mansome







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