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Meet the 2012 LAFF Filmmakers #4: 'The Night Too Young' Director Olmo Omerzu

By Indiewire | Indiewire June 13, 2012 at 5:25AM

Director Olmo Omerzu was born in Ljubljana (Slovenia). At age 13, he won the Slovenian National Television's screenplay competition for young artists which enabled him to direct his first short feature, "Almir." In 2004, he enrolled at the Prague film academy FAMU, and directed a 40-minute feature, "The Second Act" which won awards at several European festivals.
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"The Night Too Young"
"The Night Too Young"

Director Olmo Omerzu was born in Ljubljana (Slovenia). At age 13, he won the Slovenian National Television's screenplay competition for young artists which enabled him to direct his first short feature, "Almir." In 2004, he enrolled at the Prague film academy FAMU, and directed a 40-minute feature, "The Second Act" which won awards at several European festivals.  

His new film "The Night Too Young" is screening in the narrative competition at this year's LAFF. 

What's it about: On New Year’s Night two boys on the edge of puberty end up together with two men in a young woman’s apartment where they become witnesses and at the same time tools of the dangerous liaisons of adults. David, Katerina and Stepan are torn between seduction, lust and yearning for love, which ultimately leads to hurt and disappointment. At the break of dawn each of them is at least one night older.

Director Omerzu says: "It'll be the first time presenting film in the United States and I'm very curious to see how the American audiences will react to it"

On the challenges: "1) To find the right actors, especially the boys – all significant attributes of the film are reflected in their faces. 2) To communicate with the financiers the "open" length of the film in the range between 50-80 minutes – it was known from the beginning this freedom in the editing room was needed. In the end, the film lasts 62 minutes and I am sure it is perfect for the story and still feels like a feature."

What would you like the LAFF audiences to come away with after seeing your film: "When I began working on this film I started out with the assumption that the main characters are people who on some hidden level elusive, or are afraid of their feelings growing into love, and above all they don't question themselves about this. I wanted the film to portray human relations that are driven not by love but by power games, destructive lust and the desire to subordinate one another."

On the film's inspirations: "I didn't have any specific reference while making "A Night Too Young."

Future Projects: "Currently I'm working on a screenplay for my next full-length feature A Family Film. It is about a family in extremely tense situations, and it is the father’s dog, stuck on a desert island, that saves the family from falling apart. I play with the idea of alienation within a family unit. What happens when we remove the figures of the king and queen from the “family chess game”: which family members become the leading actors? How are roles divided? How is responsibility transferred to others within family? A Family Film breaks the family down into prime factors.

Indiewire invited LAFF competition directors to tell us about their films, including what inspired them, the challenges they faced and what they're doing next. We'll be publishing their responses leading up to the 2012 festival. Keep checking HERE every day up to the launch for the latest profiles.

This article is related to: Los Angeles Film Festival, Meet the 2012 LAFF Filmmakers