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TIFF FUTURES: 'The Brass Teapot' Director Ramaa Mosley On Her Love for the Magical and Supernatural

Indiewire By Indiewire | Indiewire September 8, 2012 at 9:22AM

Born in a California ashram, director Ramaa Mosley says that homeschooling left her plenty of time during her childhood to watch movies. She was from her earliest years, "transfixed by stories about magical objects and supernatural events," and knew by her twelfth birthday that she wanted to get behind the camera herself. It should come as no surprise then, that for her first feature film, Mosley has adapted "The Brass Teapot," a comic book that follows a down-and-out young couple who stumble upon a mysterious teapot, and "believe that it might be the answer to all of their dreams."
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Ramaa Mosley

Born in a California ashram, director Ramaa Mosley says that homeschooling left her plenty of time during her childhood to watch movies. She was from her earliest years, "transfixed by stories about magical objects and supernatural events," and knew by her twelfth birthday that she wanted to get behind the camera herself. It should come as no surprise then, that for her first feature film, Mosley has adapted "The Brass Teapot," a comic book that follows a down-and-out young couple who stumble upon a mysterious teapot, and "believe that it might be the answer to all of their dreams."

What it's about: "Many people would read the script and think of it as dark but I saw it as very funny and whimsical. At its core, 'The Brass Teapot' is a fable about temptation and how people can be tempted by greed. The combination of the incredible mythology behind the brass teapot intersecting with this evocative love story about a couple struggling. I felt that the story was something many people would respond to at this moment in time."

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Voice and scale: "[The] biggest challenge in developing the movie was getting the tone right. Also, I wanted the movie to feel big in scope even though we were very small."

On finding inspiration in humble heros: "'Witches of Eastwick,' 'War of the Roses,' 'Cocoon,' 'ET.' I love movies in which the most unlikely, average, individual discovers that they are destined for something great."

Next up: "Well, I have five projects...But let's wait to see what people think of 'The Brass Teapot' before I start pitching future projects. Hopefully I'll get a chance to make another movie."


Indiewire invited select newcomers to the Toronto International Film Festival to tell us about their films, including what inspired them, the challenges they faces, and what they're doing next. We'll be publishing their responses throughout TIFF. Go HERE to read other profiles.

 
 
 
What it's about: "Many people would read the script and think of it as dark but I saw it as very funny and whimsical. At its core, 'The Brass Teapot' is a fable about temptation and how people can be tempted by greed. The combination of the incredible mythology behind the brass teapot intersecting with this evocative love story about a couple struggling. I felt that the story was something many people would respond to at this moment in time."
 
Tone and scale: "[The] biggest challenge in developing the movie was getting the tone right. Also, I wanted the movie to feel big in scope even though we were very small."
 
On the inspiration of humble heros: 'Witches of Eastwick,' 'War of the Roses,' 'Cocoon,' 'ET.' I love movies in which the most unlikely, average, individual discovers that they are destined for something great.
Whit's about: "Many people would read the script and think of it as dark but I saw it as very funny and whimsical. At its core, 'The Brass Teapot' is a fable about temptation and how people can be tempted by greed. The combination of the incredible mythology behind the brass teapot intersecting with this evocative love story about a couple struggling. I felt that the story was something many people would respond to at this moment in time."
 
Tone and scale: "[The] biggest challenge in developing the movie was getting the tone right. Also, I wanted the movie to feel big in scope even though we were very small."
 
On the inspiration of humble heros: 'Witches of Eastwick,' 'War of the Roses,' 'Cocoon,' 'ET.' I love movies in which the most unlikely, average, individual discovers that they are destined for something great. 

This article is related to: The Brass Teapot, The Brass Teapot, Ramaa Mosley, Meet the 2012 TIFF Filmmakers, Toronto International Film Festival