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"Moneyball," "Descendants" Among Toronto Film Fest's First Batch of Announced Titles

Photo of Peter Knegt By Peter Knegt | Indiewire July 26, 2011 at 4:16AM

Brad Pitt, Lars von Trier, Tilda Swinton, Francis Ford Coppola, Cameron Crowe, Madonna, Sarah Polley, Juliette Binoche, Alexander Payne, Kristin Scott Thomas, Fernando Meirelles, Jane Fonda, Mia Farrow, Ryan Gosling, Elizabeth Olsen, Seth Rogen and George Clooney are among those with films heading to the Toronto International Film Festival this year.
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Brad Pitt, Lars von Trier, Tilda Swinton, Francis Ford Coppola, Cameron Crowe, Madonna, Sarah Polley, Juliette Binoche, Alexander Payne, Kristin Scott Thomas, Fernando Meirelles, Jane Fonda, Mia Farrow, Ryan Gosling, Elizabeth Olsen, Seth Rogen and George Clooney are among those with films heading to the Toronto International Film Festival this year.

Check out the complete list of announced titles here

At a press conference today in the Canadian city, festival co-director Cameron Bailey and CEO and director Piers Handling were on hand to announce the first batch of TIFF's 36th slate (which is expected to eventually be made up of 250 or so films as the film slowly announces their schedule).

“As you can see, it’s shaping up to be a really, really exciting festival, and we’re very, very thankful to all the filmmakers, producers and industry partners for bringing these films to Toronto," Handling said at the conference.

Among them, the world premieres of Francis Ford Coppola's "Twixt," Rodrigo Garcia's "Albert Nobbs," Bennett Miller's "Moneyball," Oren Moverman's "Rampart," Sarah Polley's "Take This Waltz," Fernando Meirelles's "360," Alexander Payne's "The Descendants," Bruce Beresford's "Peace, Love & Misunderstanding," Luc Besson's "The Lady," Roland Emmerich's "Anonymous," Jonathan Levine's "50/50," Jay & Mark Duplass's "Jeff, Who Loves at Home" Derick Matrini's "Hick," Cameron Crowe's "Pearl Jam Twenty," Pawel Pawlikowski's "Woman in the Fifth," and Terence Davies's "The Deep Blue Sea" (which is perhaps the biggest surprise in that it will not be screening at Venice, which seemed appropriate).

Another world premiere will open the festival, U2 documentary "From The Sky Down," directed by Davis Guggenheim. This marks a departure for the festival, which typically opens with Canadian and/or narrative films.

“When we were looking at possible opening night selections this year, it became clear that an inspiring account of artists honing their craft is the perfect film to kick off our 11-day celebration of artists, stories and voices from around the world," Cameron Bailey said at the press conference. "We’re proud to announce that for the very first time in 36 years, the Toronto International Film Festival is opening with a documentary. Our opening night film is Davis Guggenheim’s From the Sky Down, a documentary about world-renowned Irish rock band U2. This powerful marriage of music and film honours U2’s talent, dedication, and music’ Guggenheim’s extraordinary access really speaks to the continued importance of the documentary form, and we look forward to sharing this film with audiences on our opening night.”

The world premieres join a slew of films from around the world that will or have screened elsewhere first, including suspected or confirmed Venice premieres "The Ides of March," "Shame," "W.E.," and "Killer Joe," Cannes holdovers "Melancholia," "We Need To Talk About Kevin" and "Where Do We Go Now?," and Sundance's "Martha Marcy May Marlene," "Take Shelter," and "Like Crazy."

Bailey said that this year's mandate is to "screen the best cinema we can find from every part of the globe." He noted that when the final announcements are made towards the end of August, "you’ll get a sense of how comprehensive the search has been.”

Check out the complete list of announced titles with descriptions here.

This article is related to: Martha Marcy May Marlene





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