Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

New "Indie" Magazine Clarifies Editorial Policy

Indiewire By Indiewire | Indiewire February 19, 1998 at 2:0AM

by Maud KersnowskiExecutives of a new independent film magazine are backing away from plansto sell all editorial space to advertisers, contradicting an introductorypromotional packet distributed recently. Instead, the magazine, called"Indie", will follow a more traditional format when it launches thissummer."Indie's" executives recently disavowed any intention of publishingarticles paid for by a film or studio. "Indie's cover will never be sold,"according to Editor-in-Chief and Publisher Joseph Steuer, a former writerfor "The Hollywood Reporter." "And at this moment, the articles are notfor sale," said Steuer. He confirmed, however, that sections of themagazine may be sponsored by advertisers.A marketing packet, which discussed selling editorial space, was sent toindependent film organizations by mistake, according to "Indie's"Publications Director Kevin Hyson. "We're kicking ourselves that it everwent out," Hyson told indieWIRE recently.While Hachette Filipacchi Custom Services Manager Dawn Erickson refusedto comment on why the packet was sent out, Steuer told indieWIRE yesterdaythat the information was prematurely distributed by a consulting firm hiredby Hachette, the magazine's owner, to acquire mailing lists for the magazine.The concept that every page could be bought by advertisers was one ofseveral prototypes of the magazine. A prototype was nixed in development,but not before brochures were sent touting, "Every page including the FrontCover, is available to an advertiser for sponsorship."The criticism of the marketing packet from film journalists and theindependent film community centered on the packet's implication that P.R.and marketing personnel would control the magazine's content. "Indie'seditors will work with a film's marketing and promotional staff to developa story about the movie, an interview with the director or stars, asynopses of the film, a pre-release review, behind the scenes gossip, aspecial column etc.," the packet proclaimed.While the latest concept for Indie's editorial content is different, thetargeted audience remains the same. Indie will be free magazine mailed toindependent film viewers . This distinguishes it from magazines with moreindustry-focused readerships, such as "FILMMAKER" and "The Independent Filmand Video Monthly". According to Steuer, the new magazine targets filmpatrons rather than filmmakers. He added that Indie's mailing list isbeing culled from various organizations, including film festivals,screenings, and seminar series' & museums. Steuer offered that Hachette isspending over six figures building a list that is targeted to reach 250,000people.The magazine's articles will contain the usual movie magazine staples:features, columns, interviews and behind-the-scenes stories. Filmsdistributed by studio specialty divisions make up the bulk of the content.The amount of space devoted to smaller films and non-features, such asdocumentaries, shorts, and animated films, remains to be decided, accordingto Editor-in-Chief Steuer.The basic article format is similar to "Premiere" magazine, also owned byHachette Filipacchi, but "Indie" executives are distancing the newpublication from its more established sibling. "We're not like 'Premiere',"says Steuer. A source close to Premiere told indieWIRE that Indie'sreluctance to associate itself with the older magazine may have arisen fromPremiere's staff bristling at the implication, made by a recent tradepublication article, that "Indie" was a "Premiere" spinoff.
0

by Maud Kersnowski




Executives of a new independent film magazine are backing away from plans
to sell all editorial space to advertisers, contradicting an introductory
promotional packet distributed recently. Instead, the magazine, called
"Indie", will follow a more traditional format when it launches this
summer.


"Indie's" executives recently disavowed any intention of publishing
articles paid for by a film or studio. "Indie's cover will never be sold,"
according to Editor-in-Chief and Publisher Joseph Steuer, a former writer
for "The Hollywood Reporter." "And at this moment, the articles are not
for sale," said Steuer. He confirmed, however, that sections of the
magazine may be sponsored by advertisers.


A marketing packet, which discussed selling editorial space, was sent to
independent film organizations by mistake, according to "Indie's"
Publications Director Kevin Hyson. "We're kicking ourselves that it ever
went out," Hyson told indieWIRE recently.


While Hachette Filipacchi Custom Services Manager Dawn Erickson refused
to comment on why the packet was sent out, Steuer told indieWIRE yesterday
that the information was prematurely distributed by a consulting firm hired
by Hachette, the magazine's owner, to acquire mailing lists for the magazine.


The concept that every page could be bought by advertisers was one of
several prototypes of the magazine. A prototype was nixed in development,
but not before brochures were sent touting, "Every page including the Front
Cover, is available to an advertiser for sponsorship."


The criticism of the marketing packet from film journalists and the
independent film community centered on the packet's implication that P.R.
and marketing personnel would control the magazine's content. "Indie's
editors will work with a film's marketing and promotional staff to develop
a story about the movie, an interview with the director or stars, a
synopses of the film, a pre-release review, behind the scenes gossip, a
special column etc.," the packet proclaimed.


While the latest concept for Indie's editorial content is different, the
targeted audience remains the same. Indie will be free magazine mailed to
independent film viewers . This distinguishes it from magazines with more
industry-focused readerships, such as "FILMMAKER" and "The Independent Film
and Video Monthly
". According to Steuer, the new magazine targets film
patrons rather than filmmakers. He added that Indie's mailing list is
being culled from various organizations, including film festivals,
screenings, and seminar series' & museums. Steuer offered that Hachette is
spending over six figures building a list that is targeted to reach 250,000
people.


The magazine's articles will contain the usual movie magazine staples:
features, columns, interviews and behind-the-scenes stories. Films
distributed by studio specialty divisions make up the bulk of the content.
The amount of space devoted to smaller films and non-features, such as
documentaries, shorts, and animated films, remains to be decided, according
to Editor-in-Chief Steuer.


The basic article format is similar to "Premiere" magazine, also owned by
Hachette Filipacchi, but "Indie" executives are distancing the new
publication from its more established sibling. "We're not like 'Premiere',"
says Steuer. A source close to Premiere told indieWIRE that Indie's
reluctance to associate itself with the older magazine may have arisen from
Premiere's staff bristling at the implication, made by a recent trade
publication article, that "Indie" was a "Premiere" spinoff.