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Not At Cannes? Make Your Own 'No Cannes Do' Festival With These Films Already In Theaters

Photo of Peter Knegt By Peter Knegt | Indiewire May 15, 2013 at 11:57AM

The 66th Cannes Film Festival is kicking off right now, and maybe you're already in the south of France with a glass of rosé in your hand, skimming through the festival program. However, for the vast majority of us, this is not the case.
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Sunday, May 19:
Stories We Tell (Sarah Polley)
One of the most acclaimed films to come out of Venice and Toronto last fall, Sarah Polley's deeply personal documentary about her own family is now in theaters, and it's better than any documentary you'll see in Cannes competition (because there are no documentaries in Cannes' competition, but still).  Polley uses home movies, new interviews and voice-over narration to explore secrets in her own family in the incredibly moving doc, which will give you yet another reason to love the Canadian child actress turned woman who can clearly do anything (including sit on the Cannes jury that gave the Palme to "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days" -- sorry, we needed another Cannes connection).

Monday, May 20-Friday, May 24:
The Angel's Share (Ken Loach), Mud (Jeff Nichols), Sightseers (Ben Wheatley), Reality (Matteo Garrone) and Post Tenebras Lux (Carlos Reygadas)
If they were good enough for Cannes last year, they are good enough for No-Cannes-Do this year. These five films all screened at last year's festival, and three of them won major prizes (Grand Prix winner "Reality," best director winner "Post Tenebras Lux" and Jury Prize winner "The Angel's Share"). And it just so happens all of them are now currently in U.S. theaters. So make like it's 2012 and take one each weeknight next week (and if you've already seen or two, home-view "Amour," "Holy Motors," "Rust and Bone," "Moonrise Kingdom" or "Cosmopolis" instead).

Before Midnight

Saturday, May 25:
Before Midnight (Richard Linklater)
The likely frontrunner for your Palme de No One Cares, Richard Linklater, Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy's wonderful third collaboration in the "Before" series hits U.S. theaters as Cannes starts coming to a close. It might just be the must see indie of the summer, and those poor folks at Cannes will miss out (though let's be honest, if they are at Cannes they probably were at Sundance, SXSW and/or Tribeca, and "Before Midnight" screened at all three). The film reunites us with Jesse (Hawke) and Céline (Delpy) almost two decades after they met on a train bound for Vienna in "Before Sunrise." Now in their early 40s, "Midnight" finds the couple reuniting in Greece and likely facing a time constraint related to 12am, though try not to let yourself know much more than that going in.  The less known the better as we enter the third chapter of one of the great love stories of American indie cinema.

Sunday, May 26 (Closing Night Film)
Behind The Candelabra (Steven Soderbergh)
Just five days after everyone at Cannes had to dress up in black tie and put on their faces to go see Steven Sodebergh's "Behind The Candelabra," you can do so in your own living room! On May 26th, the first ever HBO film to screen in competition in Cannes will hit U.S. small screens.  Based on Scott Thorson’s 1988 memoir, "Behind the Candelabra: My Life With Liberace," the film stars Michael Douglas as Liberace and Matt Damon as Thorson, his longtime lover. We suggest you hold a Liberace-themed closing night party for your little festival in your own living room, upping the ante from a no-fancy dress code to "Liberace-fabulous." Break out the cheap wine and you'll probably have way more fun than anyone stuck inside the stuffy closing night festivities over in Cannes.

This article is related to: Cannes Film Festival, The Great Gatsby, Before Midnight , Frances Ha, Behind the Candelabra





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