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NYFF Review: With 'Flight,' the Festival Caps a Spiritual 50th Year

Photo of Eric Kohn By Eric Kohn | Indiewire October 14, 2012 at 1:45PM

The New York Film Festival has chosen to acknowledge the landmark moment of its 50th year with paragons of the medium, none more pronounced than its closing night selection.
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Denzel Washington in "Flight."
Paramount Denzel Washington in "Flight."

The New York Film Festival has chosen to acknowledge the landmark moment of its 50th year with paragons of the medium, none more pronounced than its closing-night selection. Robert Zemeckis hasn't made a live-action feature since 2000's "Cast Away," which makes it appropriate that his return to the form, "Flight," also involves a plane crash and grand themes of regret and reconciliation centered around a dedicated lead performance. Now he has made another Hollywood spectacle, this one far sturdier.

"Flight" soars above "Cast Away" with a more fully realized calibration of suspense, entertainment value and emotional payoff. Slickly paced and carried by mature performances, "Flight" embodies one of the finer strains of Hollywood filmmaking in recent years. In a larger sense, it figures into a portrait of global cinema that has felt especially complete at this year's NYFF.

Beyond its impressive special effects (a touchstone of Zemeckis' career), "Flight" foregrounds movie stars in firm control of their material, particularly its leading man: Denzel Washington delivers one of his most astute roles in years as Captain Whip Whitaker, the alcoholic pilot of a doomed plane who manages to land it in a spectacular feat before dealing with the investigation into his culpability. Zemeckis' tight direction jives nicely with John Gatis' long-admired screenplay, resulting in a stylishly engaging character study with bold stabs at big ideas.

The last five words of the previous sentence could equally apply to Ang Lee's "Life of Pi," which opened the 50th edition of the New York Film Festival. "Flight" closes it with another overtly spiritual movie about men in search of meaning behind the cruelties afflicted upon them. Both "Life of Pi" and "Flight" directly invoke religion, a distinguishing aspect that may testify to their commercial viability as well as the foolhardy ingredients of the classic redemption story.

But where "Life of Pi" celebrates the possibilities of faith in a higher authority, "Flight" sublimates its dogma into a shrewd narrative about surviving addiction and coming to grips with the imperfections of human behavior. As a studio product, "Flight" broadly emphasizes concepts with noticeable currency in contemporary culture and visible throughout this year's program.

Holy Motors

In the span of less than a month, NYFF has unveiled a wide variety of international cinema, but nearly all of it has been haunted by death. The specter of colonialism hangs over the Portuguese films "Tabu" and "The Last Time I Saw Macao," where characters both real and imaginary face untimely deaths. The French-Algerian war casts a shadow on the young revolutionaries of Olivier Assayas' "Something in the Air," while the Civil War imbues each scene in Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" with a grim atmosphere. Leos Carax's "Holy Motors" includes more than one solemn death scene as well as an abstract form of wonder for the fragility of life, while "Leviathan" assumes the perspective of dead fish.

Despite such dour connective tissue, each finds a source of catharsis in the power of movies to explore this timeless inevitability. In a world still recovering from global financial collapse, crippled by ferociously partisan ideologies and murky predictions about our future prospects, the pervasively dour temperament makes sense. Even the expensive studio movies acknowledge as much while striking a tentatively positive note.

In "Flight," Whip deals with his role in an incident that killed six people and constantly tries to bury his guilt. "Whose god would do this?" asks Washington's character as he spends most of the running time trying to evade responsibility for his actions. These include the lines of coke he does before his ill-fated flight and the homemade mimosa he cooks up during it. In between those moments, he navigates choppy weather with ease, establishing the no-nonsense piloting skills that enable him to land the damaged aircraft in a field through a near-miraculous moment of acrobatic versatility.

This article is related to: Reviews, 50th New York Film Festival, New York Film Festival, Flight, Denzel Washington, Robert Zemeckis






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