Celebrating 17 Years of Film.Biz.Fans.
by Dana Harris
October 30, 2011 4:55 AM
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Watch: Occupy Cinema Celebrates Halloween With a 21st-Century Drive In

How does the Occupy movement celebrate Halloween? With a screening program that ranges from little-seen foreign shorts to the iconic zombies of George Romero.

As we reported earlier this week, Occupy Cinema is set to launch November 1. (Defined briefly: "An open collective harnessing the moving image to aid the worldwide occupation movement in expressing its ideas.")

New York will get a Halloween-themed sneak preview tonight with a two-part series inside Zuccotti Park. Audio will be provided over radio waves, drive-in style, so all viewers "are encouraged to bring personal radios." (Does anyone have these anymore?) However, all films will be subtitled.

Full announcement and program details below. We've also included one of the full-length shorts, the 1971 "Necrology," to set the mood.

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

SHORTS — 6:30 pm
Program length approximately 50 min.

MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH (Masca crvene smrti)
Branko Ranitovic & Pavao Štalter. 1969. Yugoslavia. Animated. 10 min.

NECROLOGY
Standish Lawder. 1971. USA. 12 min.

MASCOT (Fétiche Mascotte)
Ladislaw Starewicz. 1934. France. Stop motion animation & live action. 26 min.

FEATURE — Following the 7:30 pm General Assembly at around 9:30 pm.

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD
George Romero. 1968. USA. 96 min.

Full program notes below.

OCCUPY CINEMA is an open collective harnessing the moving image to aid the worldwide occupation movement in expressing its ideas.

Soon its website will serve as a forum for open submissions related to the movement and an online source for these videos.

Submissions for future screenings are now being accepted.

Email video links to: submissions@occupycinema.org
For general information: info@occupycinema.org
Visit us online at: http://www.occupycinema.org/

MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH
Branko Ranitovic & Pavao Štalter. 1969. Yuygoslavia. Animated. Sound without dialogue. 10 min.
Preview images: http://tiny.cc/5e7cj http://tiny.cc/0wse7

As the world is devastated by plague, Count Prospero and his court take refuge inside their castle where their decadent excesses continue until a beautiful stranger enters to threaten their asylum. Ranitovi and Štalter render Poe's tale of class distinctions and the inevitable arrival of death in a beautifully earthy palette suggesting dirt, blood and disease, yet it maintains an endearingly wry sense of humor.

NECROLOGY
Standish Lawder. 1971. USA. Sound without dialogue. 12 min.
Preview: http://youtu.be/YsM4xfRKhUk

A stationary camera fixes on the blank faced commuters of Grand Central Station, whose escalator ascent takes on ghastly dimensions. "It is one of the strongest and grimmest comments upon the contemporary society that cinema has produced," Jonas Mekas wrote of this darkly funny and macabre classic of experimental cinema.

MASCOT
Ladislaw Starewicz. 1934. France. Stopmotion animation & live action. Minimal dialogue in English. 26 min.
Preview: http://youtu.be/AxA-5dIPaa0

A sick girl asks her mother for an orange, who tells her the family can't afford it. Her stuffed dog sets out on a journey to track one down, ultimately coming face to face with harsh realities of slum life before wandering into a ghastly Devil's Ball full of sundry spooks, creeps and goblins. Starewicz was a—perhaps the—pioneer of stop motion animation. Made 20 years into his career, MASCOT continued apace with marvelous innovations that dazzle and confound to this day. It also offers a unique mix of social realist critique and fantastical wizardry at once dark and playful.

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD
George Romero. 1968. USA. English. 96 min.

Decades later, this immeasurably influential horror flick remains a progressive cinematic landmark, losing none of its power to stir the consciousness or chill the bone. Its seminal depiction of the undead continues to capture the popular imagination, as evinced by early October’s “Corporate Zombies” march the Monday after the Brooklyn Bridge arrests.

Special Thanks: Standish Lawder, Roy Frumkes, George Romero

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