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"Oh" Wins Audience Prize in Brooklyn

By Indiewire | Indiewire June 19, 2006 at 2:50AM

Billy Kent's "The Oh in Ohio" won the audience award for best feature at the 9th edition of the Brooklyn International Film Festival, while Joseph Mathew & Dan DeVivo's "Crossing Arizona" was awarded the best doc award in audience ballotting. The 2006 Grand Chameleon Award and the prize for best feature went to Libero De Rienzo's "Blood: Death Does Not Exist", while the Diane Seligman Award for best documentary went to Julie Soto's "Radiophobia." Dyana Gaye's "Ousmane" won the award for best short film and Douglas Steiner, the chairman of Brooklyn's Steiner Studios, was presented the Brooklyn Excellence Award. The prize for best new director went to Joel Palombo for "Milk & Opium." For more information and the complete list of winners, please visit the festival's website. [Eugene Hernandez]
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Billy Kent's "The Oh in Ohio" won the audience award for best feature at the 9th edition of the Brooklyn International Film Festival, while Joseph Mathew & Dan DeVivo's "Crossing Arizona" was awarded the best doc award in audience ballotting. The 2006 Grand Chameleon Award and the prize for best feature went to Libero De Rienzo's "Blood: Death Does Not Exist", while the Diane Seligman Award for best documentary went to Julie Soto's "Radiophobia." Dyana Gaye's "Ousmane" won the award for best short film and Douglas Steiner, the chairman of Brooklyn's Steiner Studios, was presented the Brooklyn Excellence Award. The prize for best new director went to Joel Palombo for "Milk & Opium." For more information and the complete list of winners, please visit the festival's website. [Eugene Hernandez]





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