Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

REELER: What's Up at the Village Voice?

Indiewire By Indiewire | Indiewire November 15, 2006 at 8:26AM

For weeks now, indie film insiders have been bemoaning the steady stream of departures at The Village Voice. In a lengthy 3,000 word story at The Reeler, S.T. VanAirsdale takes a close look at the paper and the big changes that have been taking place in the Film section at the publication. As VanAirsdale noted, "readers have witnessed the last six months' turnover and attrition spin the 51-year-old paper into a somewhat benign -- some would say banal -- version of its former self." And as he adds in the opening of the article:For everyone fretting about the changes sweeping the vaunted film section of the Village Voice, you can relax: Jim Hoberman is staying. There is that. The interim replacement for fired section editor Dennis Lim may have lasted only two days before giving his notice, the budget may roughly amount to just a third of its size prior to last winter's merger with the New Times chain, the popular year-end critics' poll may have been cancelled, a number of respected freelance critics and feature writers may have disappeared from its pages and its de-emphasis on local independent and repertory releases may end up alienating some of its advertisers, but at least you have that one institutional continuity to bank on. Everything else is anybody's guess.
0

For weeks now, indie film insiders have been bemoaning the steady stream of departures at The Village Voice. In a lengthy 3,000 word story at The Reeler, S.T. VanAirsdale takes a close look at the paper and the big changes that have been taking place in the Film section at the publication. As VanAirsdale noted, "readers have witnessed the last six months' turnover and attrition spin the 51-year-old paper into a somewhat benign -- some would say banal -- version of its former self." And as he adds in the opening of the article:

For everyone fretting about the changes sweeping the vaunted film section of the Village Voice, you can relax: Jim Hoberman is staying. There is that. The interim replacement for fired section editor Dennis Lim may have lasted only two days before giving his notice, the budget may roughly amount to just a third of its size prior to last winter's merger with the New Times chain, the popular year-end critics' poll may have been cancelled, a number of respected freelance critics and feature writers may have disappeared from its pages and its de-emphasis on local independent and repertory releases may end up alienating some of its advertisers, but at least you have that one institutional continuity to bank on. Everything else is anybody's guess.