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Summer Movie Preview: The 50 Indies You Must See (Part 5)

By Indiewire | Indiewire April 26, 2013 at 10:55AM

Indiewire's epic summer movie preview is completed today with part 5 of our series highlighting 50 indie films we think you should see this summer. Head back over to part 1 for a full introduction and the first batch of films and to part 2 and part 3 and part 4 for the previous sets (all of which are, like below, listed in alphabetical order).
1


We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks (May 24)

Director: Alex Gibney
Distributor: Focus World

Criticwire Average: 3 critics gave it an A- average.

Why is it a "Must See"? Prolific documentarian Alex Gibney goes behind one of the world's most important but elusive organizations, Wikileaks, to see what's happened since the organization came under attack by governments all over the world.  The film, which focuses on the organization's former de facto leader Julian Assange and follows the organization to its status today, still existing but under uncertain terms. Part of the film's drama comes from attempts to gain access to Assange who is resisting extradition for sexual assault accusations in the UK. [Bryce J. Renninger]

Check out the film's trailer:


What Maisie Knew (May 3)

Director:  Scott McGehee, David Siegel
Cast:  Alexander Skarsgård, Julianne Moore, Steve Coogan
Distributor: Millennium Films

Criticwire Average: 14 critics gave it a B+ average.

Why is it a "Must See"? While the works of Henry James wouldn't necessarily seem to lend themselves well to being contemporized, it's still surprising that his "What Maisie Knew" has never had a major film adaptation before, as it remains a pretty unflinching look at post-divorce child upbringing through the eyes of the title character. But now "Bee Season" and "Uncertainty" co-directors Scott McGehee and David Siegel are bringing James' novel into the 21st century, with touted newcomer Onata Aprile as the titular six year old, observing the bitter custody battle between her aging rocker mom (Julianne Moore) and art dealer dad (Steve Coogan). The film played at Toronto last year, where the acting of everyone involved was praised, which isn't surprising given the on-screen talent. [Mark E. Lukenbill]

Check out the film's trailer:


You're Next (August 23)

Director: Adam Wingard
Cast: Sharni Vinson, Amy Seimetz, Kate Lyn Sheil, Joe Swanberg, Ti West
Distributor: Lionsgate

Criticwire Average: 16 critics gave it a B+ average

Why is it a "Must See"? Originally debuting at Toronto way, way back in 2011, "You're Next" received a considerable amount of acclaim which has since turned into buzzy enthusiasm when the film was consecutively shelved, where it collected dust (and raves on horror blogs) until it screened at SXSW this year. Adam Wingard and Simon Barrett, the team behind "A Horrible Way to Die" and the horror anthology "V/H/S," have created a tightly-wound horror film with a refreshing goofy side, following a massacre at a family reunion in the wooded mansion of the family's parents.

Among the hunted family members is pretty much every low budget "mumblecore" filmmaker/director currently working, from Joe Swanberg to Amy Seimetz to fellow horror auteur Ti West. Will it live up to the hype? At the very least, we can promise that it's a highly entertaining and twisted survival tale. [Mark E. Lukenbill]

Check out the film's trailer:

READ MORE: Summer Movie Preview: The 50 Indies You Must See (Part 1)

READ MORE: Summer Movie Preview: The 50 Indies You Must See (Part 2)

READ MORE: Summer Movie Preview: The 50 Indies You Must See (Part 3)

READ MORE: Summer Movie Preview: The 50 Indies You Must See (Part 4)




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