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SXSW '11 | indieWIRE's Reviews and the Best Links From Around The Web

Photo of Nigel M Smith By Nigel M Smith | Indiewire March 14, 2011 at 4:55AM

The 2011 SXSW Film Conference and Festival officially kicked off last week in Austin and the indieWIRE team has been on the scene to report on all the happenings at the event. Below find a list of indieWIRE's SXSW film reviews thus far, along with links to news and reviews posted by our friends at other outlets. Keep checking back on our Guide To All The Films to stay up to date with what the critics have to say about this year's lineup.
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The 2011 SXSW Film Conference and Festival officially kicked off last week in Austin and the indieWIRE team has been on the scene to report on all the happenings at the event. Below find a list of indieWIRE's SXSW film reviews thus far, along with links to news and reviews posted by our friends at other outlets. Keep checking back on our Guide To All The Films to stay up to date with what the critics have to say about this year's lineup.

The 2011 SXSW Film Conference and Festival

New indieWIRE SXSW Reviews:

"Source Code"
"Better This World"
"Turkey Bowl"
"The Dish and the Spoon"
"Attack the Block"
"The Innkeepers"
"Conan O'Brien Can't Stop"
"Kevin"
"Weekend"
"Kumare"

Previously Published indieWIRE Reviews of SXSW Films:

"Super"
"Bellflower"
"Page One: A Year Inside the New York Times"
"Beginners"
"The Catechism Cataclysm"
"Insidious"

SXSW News & Reviews from Other Outlets:

Cinematical Takes On Sebastian Gutierrez's "Girl Walks Into a Bar"
"Although most of the stops are mere transitions or exposition volleys, there's something impressively "quick" about 'Girl Walks Into a Bar,' wrote Scott Weinberg in his review of the SXSW comedy, "Girl Walks Into a Bar." "The film is awash in legitimately cool ideas about empowered women, but it's Gutierrez' screenplay (and / or some rather fine improvisational work on behalf of the gigantic ensemble) that allows the tangentially-connected anecdotes to come together as a whole."

The Playlist Sits Down with "Super" Team
"I really don’t get lost in my characters in that mythical way of actors losing themselves," Rainn Wilson told The Playlist about costuming up for James Gunn's violent superhero satire, "Super." "But when you’re in a spandex outfit with a cowl and big boots and body armor and a shotgun in your hand and your face splattered in blood, it’s pretty easy to get in the mode that you need to so you can be a badass vigilante."

Movieline Hails the Wiig!
"'Bridesmaids' isn’t just the smart and grounded antidote to the shrill chick flicks we all hate," wrote Movieline's Jen Yamato in her review of Kristen Wiig's first leading lady vehicle, "it’s the most raunchy, sweet and wonderfully vulgar R-rated comedy in recent memory. Bring it, 'Hangover 2.'" The film is still a work progress and hits theaters May 13.

The Playlist Hates on "Hesher"
"...The movie feels so cloyingly indie-movie-ish in the most annoying way possible," wrote The Playlist in their trashing of Spencer Susser's "Hesher." "...it’s composed of a largely autumnal color scheme, shot in jittery hand-held, and takes its main stylistic cues (when concerning production design and set dressing) from the 1970s. To boil this down: it’s the kind of movie where characters wear large, oversized old timey glasses. That kind of movie."

Ain't It Cool Lukewarm on "Bag of Hammers"
"Now, I'm all about suspending disbelief and just accepting the terms of a unique story, but sometimes it just doesn't work," wrote Annette Kellerman in her take down of "Bag of Hammers." "In order for crazy plot devices to really gel, a film must exist in its own universe, and unfortunately 'Bag of Hammers' just fails to create a world where such inane antics will fly."

IFC Reports on Catherine Hardwicke Austin Panel
"It was the kind of panel where "Twilight" was oddly only mentioned once near the end, and Hardwicke felt obligated to detail the geography of the scene of Bella and Edward flying caroming from tree to tree, but where her first film "Thirteen" was celebrated and treated as a master class on shooting economically," reported IFC's Stephen Saito of the Director's Workshop that took place at SXSW over the weekend. [Anne Thompson reports here.]

This article is related to: Reviews, Super