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'Rosemary's Baby' Miniseries with Zoe Saldana Gets Due Date on NBC

Photo of Ben Travers By Ben Travers | Indiewire April 10, 2014 at 8:41PM

The four-hour mini-series based on Ira Levin's best-selling novel will air over two nights in two-hour segments.
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Zoe Saldana in "Rosemary's Baby" on NBC
Roger Do Minh/NBC Zoe Saldana in "Rosemary's Baby" on NBC

We're only a month away from one of the more consequential births in human -- or inhuman -- history, and NBC didn't bother to tell us until now. NBC announced today it will air "Rosemary's Baby," the miniseries based on Ira Levin's 1967 novella (and not Roman Polanski's 1968 film), on Sunday, May 11th and Thursday, May 15th.

Both dates land square in the middle of sweeps week, taking up two competitive nights from 9-11pm. The mini-series, starring Zoe Saldana, will air in two, two-hour segments.

The four-hour event centers on the wife of a young married couple who gets pregnant while living in a haunted apartment in Paris. (Both Levin's book and Polanski's adaptation are based in New York and an apartment building based on the Upper West Side's Dakota.) She becomes suspicious of her husband's intentions with their baby, and things only get crazier from there. 

Any horror film fan treats Polanski's film with a high degree of reverence, so it will prove interesting to see how this new version compares to the classic.

Directed by Agnieszka Holland, who's helmed episodes of "The Wire" and "Treme" along with films "Europa Europa" and "In Darkness," the miniseries was written by James Wong and Scott Abbott. Wong has written for "American Horror Story" and "The X-Files" while Abbott is most famous for co-penning "Queen of the Damned." Jason Isaacs and Carole Bouquet also star. Take a look below at the teaser trailer to prepare for one of 2014's more truly significant births.


This article is related to: Rosemary's Baby, NBC , NBC, Television, Zoe Saldana







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