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Rotten Tomatoes to Aggregate TV Show Reviews in New 'TV Zone'

By Ramzi De Coster | Indiewire September 16, 2013 at 4:09PM

Rotten Tomatoes, which has long served as a go-to platform for film review aggregation, will launch its first "TV Zone" on Tuesday.
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Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes, which has long served as a go-to platform for film review aggregation, will launch its first "TV Zone" on Tuesday.

Matt Atchity, editor-in-chief of Rotten Tomatoes, told Variety that the site section will be "aggregating the reviews the same way we've always been," and that it plans to duplicate its system of classifying good reviews as "Fresh" and bad reviews as "Rotten" using a TV Tomatometer. As per usual, a 60% rating and above will ensure a "Fresh" designation.

The site will, however, apply certain conditions and practices otherwise absent in aggregating film reviews. For one, it intends to rate per season as opposed to show, while more closely monitoring the way reviews fluctuate from season to season. The site's "TV Zone" will also exclude reality TV shows while placing emphasis on new fall series as well as shows aired on primetime in the last four years reviewed by major critics already familiar to Rotten Tomatoes. 

The timing of the site's "TV Zone" launch is no coincidence. With a variety of debuting and resuming TV shows set to air soon, Atchity remarked that "we thought it was a good time to get into TV because we're in the golden age of television right now." "Creatively, television is where it's at right now," he added.

Rotten Tomatoes rival Metacritic already has maintains a television section.

This article is related to: Television, TV News, Rotten Tomatoes





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