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Syfy Greenlights 'Helix,' a New Series From 'Battlestar Galactica' Showrunner Ronald D. Moore

Photo of Alison Willmore By Alison Willmore | Indiewire March 8, 2013 at 6:54AM

Syfy is getting back into business with Ronald D. Moore, the writer/producer who developed the network's crossover hit "Battlestar Galactica."
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Ronald D. Moore on the set of 'Battlestar Galactica'
Syfy Ronald D. Moore on the set of 'Battlestar Galactica'

Syfy is getting back into business with Ronald D. Moore, the writer/producer who developed the network's crossover hit "Battlestar Galactica."

Syfy's given a 13-episode order to "Helix" (a working title), a scripted series executive produced by Moore, Lynda Obst ("Contact") and Steven Maeda ("Lost") and written by Cameron Porsandeh, who'll serve as co-executive producer. The series is being produced by Sony Pictures Television.

"Helix" is a thriller about a team of Centers for Disease Control scientists who are sent to a research facility in the Arctic to look into what they thought was a disease outbreak, but what turns out to be something more dire and mysterious. Mark Stern, Syfy's President of Original Content, said in the announcement that "With its well-drawn characters, taut drama, and incredible production team, we couldn't be more excited to see this intense thrill-ride of a series come to life."

Moore, who also served as an EP on Syfy's short-lived "Battlestar Galactica" prequel "Caprica," worked on a scrapped screenplay for the recentish prequel to 1982's "The Thing." John Carpenter's film seems to have been an influence on "Helix," at least based on that description.

"Helix" is slated to begin production soon in order to debut later this year.

This article is related to: Television, TV News, Ronald D. Moore, Syfy, Helix







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