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The 10 Indies to Watch on VOD This May

Indiewire By Nigel M. Smith, Cristina Gonzales, Cameron Sinz and Mark Lukenbill | Indiewire May 2, 2013 at 11:55AM

This month on VOD: Ben Wheatley's surprisingly hilarious follow-up to "Kill List," the latest from the prolific Olivier Assayas, Shane Carruth's long-in-the-works indie mind f*ck, a festival favorite from the Zellner Brothers, and much more. Below are the 10 indies to watch on VOD in alphabetical order.
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"Sightseers"
IFC Films "Sightseers"

This month on VOD: Ben Wheatley's surprisingly hilarious follow-up to "Kill List," the latest from the prolific Olivier Assayas, Shane Carruth's long-in-the-works indie mind f*ck, a festival favorite from the Zellner Brothers, and much more. Below are the 10 indies to watch on VOD this May, in alphabetical order.

"Aftershock" (May 10)
Co-penned by and starring "Hostel" horror maestro Eli Roth, "Aftershock" doesn't skimp on the blood and guts to tell a harrowing story about a hapless group of tourists who find themselves in a living hell after a powerful earthquake rips through the coastal town of Valparaiso in Chile.

Where to Watch: iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, YouTube, Playstation, XBOX, Vudu, Time Warner


"Happy New Year" (May 14)
"Happy New Year" is a gut wrenching look into the lives of veterans dealing with PTS/PTSD. Centering on Staff Sgt. Cole Lewis, the film tracks his powerful journey from his difficult return home to his integral role in the healing of a group of other war vets and survivors in the psych ward of a veterans hospital. Developed with over 80 hours of personal interviews, the film is a realistic depiction of life after war.

Where to Watch: iTunes, Comcast, Verizon, FIOS, XBox, Vudu, Amazon, Google Play


"Honor Flight" (May 14)
You may not know some of the local heroes in your community or about the programs that bring recognition for their service, but this heartwarming film will have you looking at your community members with new eyes. Honor flights are free flights provided to war veterans so that they can visit Washington, D.C. to visit the memorials resurrected in their honor. The film centers around four World War II vets and the Midwest community that rallies around them to ensure they participate in one of the more memorable days of their lives.

Where to Watch: Comcast, Verizon, FIOS, XBox, Vudu, Amazon, Google Play


"Kid Thing" (May 21)
When we were young we dreamed of the freedom of not having parents tell us what to do, but as we grew older we realized that not having parents who cared probably meant there was a problem. In the Zellner Brothers' festival favorite "Kid Thing," we see that problem come to life in Annie. She has been left to her own musings leading to mischief and trouble, until one day she stumbles upon a woman stuck in a well needing help. Annie begins to question her choices and whether or not to help the trapped woman.

Where to Watch: iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, YouTube, Playstation, XBOX, Vudu, Time Warner


"Mosquita Y Mari" (May 14)
The deft coming-of-age drama "Mosquita y Mari" centers on the relationship between Yolanda and Mari, two Latina teenagers whose families depend on them to succeed educationally and provide financially. As the girls friendship grows, their bond shifts in meaning as they question what they want for themselves and for each other.

Where to Watch: Comcast, Time Warner, Cox, iTunes, Amazon, Xbox, Vudu, Google Play


"Pieta" (May 17)
In Kim Ki-Duk's Golden Lion winner "Pieta," Lee Jung-jin stars as a brutal loan shark gathering from the impoverished residents of a small town who is forced to rethink his violent path after a women claiming to be his mother (Cho Min-soo) enters his life. Indiewire's Eric Kohn called the film a "curiously engaging & wickedly twisted tale of crime and punishment on multiple levels," in his review from the film's Toronto premiere (read his full review here).

Where to Watch: Dish, DirecTV, Comcast, Cox, Brighthouse, Charter, Time Warner, ATT, Verizon


"Sightseers" (May 13)
"Sightseers," Ben Wheatley's highly anticipated follow-up to his dark, violent and grim "Kill List," marks a change in pace for the helmer. Not to say that Wheatley's given up on the nastiness that characterized both "Kill List" and his acclaimed debut "Down Terrace" -- "Sightseers" does follow a young couple on a holiday who murder anyone who ticks them off -- but if the buzz is anything to go by, there are more laughs than scares. Think of it as Britain's answer to John Water's Kathleen Turner-starring "Serial Mom."

Where to Watch: Bright House, Cablevision, Comcast, Cox, Insight, Time Warner


"Something In the Air" (May 3)
Best known for the intimate and highly personal dramas ("Summer Hours," "Irma Vep") that have won him a following, Olivier Assayas achieved international success on a new level with his last project, the award-winning five-hour epic "Carlos," shown as a miniseries in three parts on the Sundance Channel in the U.S. While that film differed in both scope and content then, say, 1994's teen romantic drama "Cold Water," Assayas seems to be back to exploring more personal territory with his latest, "Something in the Air." "Something of the Air" was a staple on the festival circuit last year. The largely autobiographical story follows an aspiring young filmmaker (newcomer Clement Metayer) as he is pulled into the world of radical art and political activism in 1971 France.

Where to Watch: Bright House, Cablevision, Comcast, Cox, Insight, Time Warner


"Syrup" (May 2)
Based on Max Barry's cult novel "Syrup," this winking satire on the advertising and business worlds centers on Scat (Shiloh Fernandez), who brainstorms a soda beverage called Fukk Cola and bands together, both romantically and professionally, with 6 (Amber Heard), the production manager at Coke.

Where to Watch: iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, YouTube, Playstation, XBOX, Vudu, Time Warner


"Upstream Color" (May 7)
Nearly 10 years after his debut "Primer" topped Sundance's awards, Shane Carruth has finally offered us a follow-up with "Upstream Color," which premiered at Sundance earlier this year. "The plot of 'Upstream Color' is tough to define but not exactly intangible," Eric Kohn wrote in Indiewire's Sundance review. "An advanced cinematic collage of ideas involving the slipperiness of human experience. Carruth's polished, highly expressionistic work bears little comparison to his previous feature aside from the constant mental stimulation it provides for its audience."

Where to Watch: iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, YouTube, Playstation, XBOX, Vudu, Time Warner



This article is related to: New On VOD, VOD, VODetails, Lists