Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...
Steve Carell Redefined His Career By Surprising Everyone in 'Foxcatcher' Steve Carell Redefined His Career By Surprising Everyone in 'Foxcatcher' Watch: Ellar Coltrane on the 'Brutal' Experience of Watching 'Boyhood' After Living It Watch: Ellar Coltrane on the 'Brutal' Experience of Watching 'Boyhood' After Living It Mortem Tyldum Explains Why Alan Turing Was the Right Subject For His First English-Language Film Mortem Tyldum Explains Why Alan Turing Was the Right Subject For His First English-Language Film Why Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’ is a Great, Unexpected Awards Season Frontrunner Why Richard Linklater’s ‘Boyhood’ is a Great, Unexpected Awards Season Frontrunner Watch: Patricia Arquette on Stripping Away Ego to Get to the Heart of 'Boyhood' 
Watch: Patricia Arquette on Stripping Away Ego to Get to the Heart of 'Boyhood' 'Whiplash' Breakout Miles Teller Has Officially Arrived 'Whiplash' Breakout Miles Teller Has Officially Arrived Michael Keaton Dug Deep to Deliver the Best Performance of His Career in 'Birdman' Michael Keaton Dug Deep to Deliver the Best Performance of His Career in 'Birdman' Mark Ruffalo Explains Why Dave Schultz Was One of the Most Complex Characters He's Ever Played Mark Ruffalo Explains Why Dave Schultz Was One of the Most Complex Characters He's Ever Played Keira Knightley on 'The Imitation Game' and Why Awards Matter Keira Knightley on 'The Imitation Game' and Why Awards Matter Katherine Waterston On the Good and Bad of Working With Paul Thomas Anderson Katherine Waterston On the Good and Bad of Working With Paul Thomas Anderson Emma Stone Proved She Can Do It All in 2014 Emma Stone Proved She Can Do It All in 2014 Jon Stewart is Off to a Strong Start with Directorial Debut 'Rosewater' Jon Stewart is Off to a Strong Start with Directorial Debut 'Rosewater' Awards Spotlight: Don't Be Surprised When J.K. Simmons Takes Home Oscar Awards Spotlight: Don't Be Surprised When J.K. Simmons Takes Home Oscar Jessica Chastain Proved She's a Total Chameleon in 2014 Jessica Chastain Proved She's a Total Chameleon in 2014 Laura Poitras on 'CITIZENFOUR,' The Most Dangerous Work She's Ever Done Laura Poitras on 'CITIZENFOUR,' The Most Dangerous Work She's Ever Done Jake Gyllenhaal On Doing Very Bad Things in 'Nightcrawler' Jake Gyllenhaal On Doing Very Bad Things in 'Nightcrawler' Channing Tatum Explains Why It Took Him Eight Years to Have the ‘Balls’ for ‘Foxcatcher’ Channing Tatum Explains Why It Took Him Eight Years to Have the ‘Balls’ for ‘Foxcatcher’ Ethan Hawke Didn't Know That Richard Linklater Would Bring 'Boyhood' Home So Well Ethan Hawke Didn't Know That Richard Linklater Would Bring 'Boyhood' Home So Well Jack O'Connell Explains What It’s Like to Work For Angelina Jolie Jack O'Connell Explains What It’s Like to Work For Angelina Jolie 'Red Army' Director Gabe Polsky Reveals the Story of Soviet Hockey 'Red Army' Director Gabe Polsky Reveals the Story of Soviet Hockey How Felicity Jones is Getting Noticed This Awards Season How Felicity Jones is Getting Noticed This Awards Season Edward Norton Goes Full-Blown For Alejandro González Iñárritu in 'Birdman' Edward Norton Goes Full-Blown For Alejandro González Iñárritu in 'Birdman' How Eddie Redmayne Transformed His Body and Mind to Become Stephen Hawking How Eddie Redmayne Transformed His Body and Mind to Become Stephen Hawking Oscar Isaac Explains How 'A Most Violent Year' Fits With His Other Roles Oscar Isaac Explains How 'A Most Violent Year' Fits With His Other Roles Timothy Spall Almost Went Mad to Play 'Mr. Turner' For Mike Leigh Timothy Spall Almost Went Mad to Play 'Mr. Turner' For Mike Leigh 'Gone Girl' Composer Atticus Ross: How to Write a Score Without Seeing the Film 'Gone Girl' Composer Atticus Ross: How to Write a Score Without Seeing the Film How to Play James Brown, By Chadwick Boseman: Study the Man, Listen to Drake How to Play James Brown, By Chadwick Boseman: Study the Man, Listen to Drake Chris Rock on Why Making 'Top Five' Was a No-Brainer Chris Rock on Why Making 'Top Five' Was a No-Brainer Steve James and Chaz Ebert Tackled 'Life Itself' Steve James and Chaz Ebert Tackled 'Life Itself' Bennett Miller Explains Why He Had to Make 'Foxcatcher' Bennett Miller Explains Why He Had to Make 'Foxcatcher' How Do You Roll Six Movies Into One? 'Wild Tales' Director Damian Szifron Explains How Do You Roll Six Movies Into One? 'Wild Tales' Director Damian Szifron Explains How Rosario Dawson Stole the Show From Chris Rock in 'Top Five' How Rosario Dawson Stole the Show From Chris Rock in 'Top Five' Alan Hicks: From Drummer-Surfer to Oscar-Shortlist Filmmaker Alan Hicks: From Drummer-Surfer to Oscar-Shortlist Filmmaker Alejandro González Iñárritu: 'Birdman' Could Have Been 'so wrong' Alejandro González Iñárritu: 'Birdman' Could Have Been 'so wrong' Amir Bar-Lev Likes to Make People a Little Uncomfortable Amir Bar-Lev Likes to Make People a Little Uncomfortable

'The Past' Star Bérénice Bejo on Her Cannes Award Winning Performance and Working With Asghar Farhadi For Half a Year

Photo of Nigel M Smith By Nigel M Smith | Indiewire December 16, 2013 at 10:39AM

Returning to Cannes following her international breakthrough performance in 2011's awards juggernaut "The Artist," directed by her husband Michel Hazanavicius, Oscar nominee Bérénice Bejo returned the Croisette this year with another film to sure to return her to the forefront of awards talk -- Asghar Farhadi's follow-up to his Oscar-winning "A Separation," "The Past."
0
"The Past"
Cannes "The Past"

[Editor's Note: This interview originally ran during the 2013 Cannes Film Festival where "The Past" world premiered and won its star Bérénice Bejo the Best Actress award. Sony Pictures Classics opens the film this Friday, Dec. 20 in select theaters.]

Returning to Cannes following her international breakthrough performance in 2011's awards juggernaut "The Artist," directed by her husband Michel Hazanavicius, Oscar nominee Bérénice Bejo returned the Croisette this year with another film to sure to return her to the forefront of awards talk -- Asghar Farhadi's follow-up to his Oscar-winning "A Separation," "The Past."

Shot over a whopping four months in Paris following two months of intense rehearsals, "The Past," Farhadi's first film shot outside of his native Iran, centers on Ahmad (Ali Mosaffa), who after returning to Paris from Tehran in order to finalize his divorce to Marie (Bejo), discovers all is not well at home with his soon to be ex and her rebellious daughter (Pauline Burlet). In trying to bring the two together, Ahmad uncovers a secret from the past that could threaten to keep the pair at odds for life.

READ MORE: Cannes: Asghar Farhadi On Why He Still Feels Censored as a Filmmaker Despite Making 'The Past' in France and Not in Iran

Virtually unrecognizable in the role -- this is a long way from the aspiring starlet she played to chipper perfection in "The Artist"-- Bejo here delivers a deeply felt performance full of pain and regret that registers as one of the highlights of the festival. We caught up with her the day after the film's well received premiere (Nicole Kidman was seen by a colleague wiping away tears on her way out of the Palais) to discuss working with a director as demanding as Farhadi, the surprising length of the shoot and the pressures associated with following up a film as popular as "The Artist."

 Berenice Bejo in "The Past"
Sony Pictures Classics Berenice Bejo in "The Past"

You seemed quite emotional at the press conference. It seemed like you were enjoying the moment.

Yeah, I was just really happy to be here, and I'm always happy to listen to Asghar [Farhadi], who is brilliant and smart in his answers. I'm very proud of the movie and what he managed to do with all of us. I felt I didn't have to fight for the movie, because people in the majority liked the movie so it was quite easy. You know what I mean? It's not like when you have a movie that people don't understand or don't like, and you have to explain why you did it and why you like it. With this movie, it's more easy.

"The Artist" is such a different film, but I'm sure the reaction must have been kind of similar.

Exactly, that's exactly what I feel like. "The Artist" was so huge, the response in Cannes was so beautiful. And I'm here again with a movie that the majority likes, so I'm going through something similar. This morning I was having tea in my room, and I was like, "Oh my god, I'm so lucky to have done this movie and worked so hard and I can see it onscreen." So yeah, I feel really lucky. 

Your performance is miles away from your breakout one in "The Artist." How did the two shooting experiences differ?

The work is obviously different, but there were some similarities. I really worked on my body language for Marie and I worked on the fact that she's tired and that she felt guilty and not loved in the way that she wants to be loved. I think the first thing to get into Marie was to get into the tiredness -- to feel the the tiredness of the life, the tiredness of the situation, the house, the train, the kids, the house is so messy and you can feel it in every shot. I really worked, like, shoulders down, knees bent, the clothes are all loose and not tight.

Altogether we really worked to give an image of Marie as obviously at the opposite of "The Artist," of the glamorousness of an actress. And that was great for me to work on, because she has such a low energy and I have such a huge energy in life. Asghar said to me when we did the audition, "I was looking in your face to see if you could doubt a little bit." The audition with Asghar lasted for one hour, he did some hair and makeup tests and took some pictures.

The Past, Asghar Farhadi, Bérénice Bejo,
And didn't he put cotton balls in your mouth? I read that somewhere.

Yeah, to try to change my mouth. At the end, Ali played the whole movie with cotton in his mouth, but not me.

Why did he do that?

I think it was to give something that is annoying, so you focus on the cotton that's in your mouth. I don't know, but it changes something. It's also a way [for Asghar] to say, "I'm the boss. I'm the boss of your face too, and I decide what you look like." For me, I have an eyebrow that goes like a little hat and he changes so that I have a very raw eyebrow. He put contact lenses on Ali, he has brown eyes but every morning he has to put on the contacts that make them more dark. Little things so that he's changing things on you and doing something to you that hasn't been done before.

At the press conference the cast explained how he blocked every move like a theater director; you called him "bossy," but in a positive light...

When I say he's bossy... maybe that's not the right world in English. He just directs everything, he's in control of everything. If he controls everything so he has control in the image, then you can do your job. That's why I'm saying he's the boss -- he's making sure your look is the right look for Marie, so he's very controlling of the costume designer, your hair and makeup to help you to look tired. So the only thing you have to do as an actor is say your lines and feel them, that's it. When I say he's the boss, he's just doing his job, which makes you feel more secure, because you don't have to take charge of the telling of the story, he's in charge of that and doing his job as a director.

Let's say, the scene in the car at the beginning of the movie. The camera is always at the back of the seat; he never goes in front of us. You never see both of our eyes, and that's his choice. It's not because he couldn't put it over our face, it's because he thought Marie and Ahmad have a past, and they don't want to look at each other. As a spectator, you want to move and see them. He's putting the audience in that situation of, "Why is he not doing a close-up? Why isn't he putting the camera over there? Something is wrong." So that's telling the story, and I just have to say the lines. I don't have to show that I have secrets, I don't have to hide anything because it's done by the camera. That's why I say he's the boss, because he's doing his job.

This article is related to: The Past , Sony Pictures, Sony Pictures Classics, Bérénice Bejo, The Artist, Cannes Film Festival, Interviews, Asghar Farhadi, Drama, Awards Season Roundup, Academy Awards






Check out Indiewire on LockerDome on LockerDome



Awards Season Spotlight

Contender Conversations

Indiewire celebrates the best and brightest from Independent film, Hollywood, and foreign cinema.

More