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The Alamo Drafthouse's Movie Posters Join the Academy (Now, What About Tim League?)

Photo of Dana Harris By Dana Harris | Indiewire July 11, 2011 at 6:3AM

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Margaret Herrick Library announced a partnership with the Alamo Drafthouse franchise to archive its Mondo collection of original film posters.
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The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Margaret Herrick Library announced a partnership with the Alamo Drafthouse franchise to archive its Mondo collection of original film posters.

And Mondo has launched a digital archive that chronicles all poster releases since it first produced the limited-edition silkscreen posters in 2003. Mondo now produces more than 120 each year with artists such as Martin Ansin, Shepard Fairey, Olly Moss, Tyler Stout and Ken Taylor.

Categorized as an "ongoing gift" to the Academy library, the posters will be stored with the Herrick’s existing collection of more than 38,000 movie posters in climate-controlled vaults. They are scanned and entered into the library’s online catalog for public viewing.

The Herrick is regarded as one of the world’s finest cinema research facilities, with more than 10 million photographs, 300,000 clipping files, 80,000 screenplays, 35,000 movie posters and 32,000 books. The first group of posters will include Mondo's latest print, a poster for the 1931 horror film “Frankenstein” created by Drew Struzan.

It's nice to see the often-staid Academy reach out to the Drafthouse; it seems like the organization's fully aware that these posters will be among their funkier entries. Per the Academy’s graphic arts librarian, Anne Coco: “We are always seeking out the unusual, and the Mondo collection certainly fits the bill." The library's collection also includes the Stenberg brothers’ constructivist poster for “Man with a Movie Camera,” Wiktor Gorka’s poster for the Polish release of “Cabaret” and all of Saul Bass' film posters.

"We're extremely grateful to the Academy for its interest in archiving Mondo's poster collection,” said Mondo creative director Justin Ishmael. “We're fans of movie art, first and foremost, and to have our artists' work archived alongside some of the classics of movie poster art is an incredible honor."

Frankly, we're grateful too; Mondo's stuff is awesome. But now that the Academy has acknowledged that fact, why not go all the way and add Alamo Drafthouse founder Tim League to the Academy's membership?

Drew Struzan's poster for "Frankenstein" (1931), which is now part of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Margaret Herrick Library as part of its Alamo Drafthouse collection.