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TIFF Capsule Review: 'The Patience Stone'

By Kaleem Aftab | Indiewire September 15, 2012 at 10:43AM

Too much like watching a filmed stage play for its own good, "The Patience Stone" is a flawed attempt to discuss the position of women in the Islamic world. Afghani born director Atiq Rahimi has adapted his own book for screen, just as he did with his previous outing in the director’s chair "Earth and Ashes" (2004). Although punctuated with a few flashbacks, Rahimi relies on beautiful Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani to carry the picture as she delivers a monologue to her comatose husband, revealing her deepest, darkest secrets, including infidelity. Bordering on madness herself, Rahimi’s attempt to describe a woman’s lot is undone by the staid mechanism by which the story is framed. It’s definitely not poetry in motion. Criticwire grade: C [Kaleem Aftab]
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Too much like watching a filmed stage play for its own good, "The Patience Stone" is a flawed attempt to discuss the position of women in the Islamic world. Afghani born director Atiq Rahimi has adapted his own book for screen, just as he did with his previous outing in the director’s chair "Earth and Ashes" (2004). Although punctuated with a few flashbacks, Rahimi relies on beautiful Iranian actress Golshifteh Farahani to carry the picture as she delivers a monologue to her comatose husband, revealing her deepest, darkest secrets, including infidelity. Bordering on madness herself, Rahimi’s attempt to describe a woman’s lot is undone by the staid mechanism by which the story is framed. It’s definitely not poetry in motion. Criticwire grade: C [Kaleem Aftab]

This article is related to: Reviews, Toronto International Film Festival, The Patience Stone