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Tribeca Film Festival Announces First Slate of Titles for 13th Annual Fest

By Taylor Lindsay | Indiewire March 4, 2014 at 11:59AM

The 13th Tribeca Film Festival is soon set to launch, running from April 16 to April 27. The Fest announced today the World Narrative and Documentary Competition selections, and selections for the out-of-competition Viewpoints section, totaling 47 of the 87 feature-length films. The rest will be announced Thursday, March 6th.
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"Gabriel"
"Gabriel"

The 13th Tribeca Film Festival is soon set to launch, running from April 16 to April 27. The Fest announced today the World Narrative and Documentary Competition selections, and selections for the out-of-competition Viewpoints section, totaling 47 of the 87 feature-length films. The rest will be announced Thursday, March 6th. 

The Festival will kick off with documentary "Time is Illmatic" about rapper Nas, who will also be present to perform at the premiere (read more here). "Dior and I" will screen as opening night for the World Documentary competition, "Gabriel" will open the World Narrative competition, and "Summer of Blood" will open the Viewpoints section. All three titles will have their world premieres on April 17.   

"Variously inspired by individual interests and experience and driven by an intense sensibility of style, the array of new filmmaking voices in this year’s competition is especially impressive and I think memorable," said Frederic Boyer, Artistic Director Tribeca Film Festival. "The range of American subcultures and international genres represented here are both eclectic and wide reaching."

The films at this year's fest are from 32 countries, and a total of 102 directors (37 of these are making their feature direction debuts) will present feature works. Take a look at the lineup below (synopses courtesy of the Fest):

"Time Is Illmatic."
"Time Is Illmatic."

World Narrative Feature Competition
In a testament to the universal power of film, the themes of this year’s competition resonate across international lines, in conversation with one another in their unique and powerful takes on self-discovery. Frequently unfolding through ensemble casts and multi-character structures- from X/Y’s overlapping group of friends exploring sex and monogamy in New York, to the cadre of inept slacker chicks pulling hijinks in the Israeli military in Zero Motivation- young people are discovering themselves in all contexts.  As it so often is, that discovery can be channeled through romantic relationships, like for Otto the recently divorced Dad of Goodbye to All That, or Something Must Break’s Sebastian, whose awakening identity comes amidst an all-consuming love affair.  This theme of authenticity in finding one’s true self resonates in the many films in which real people play fictionalized versions of themselves, such as The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq, Five Star, and the aforementioned Something Must Break.  Films in this section compete for the Founders Award for Best Narrative Feature, Best New Narrative Director, Best Actor and Actress, Best Screenplay, and Best Cinematography.

Brides, directed and written by Tinatin Kajrishvili. (France, Georgia) – North American Premiere. In the suburbs of Tbilisi, Georgia, seamstress Nutsa shares an apartment with her two young children and awaits the return of her husband, Goga, who has six years left on his prison sentence. With only rare visits and phone calls to connect with her husband, Nutsa faces difficult decisions about keeping the family together and maintaining her own freedom. In her first narrative feature, director Tinatin Kajrishvili captures an intimate look at love and absence, and a subtle indictment of the harsh Georgian penal system. In Georgian with subtitles.

Five Star, directed and written by Keith Miller. (USA) – World Premiere. A member of the notorious Bloods since he was 12 years old, Primo takes John, the son of a fallen gang member, under his wing, versing him in the code of the streets. Set amongst the streets of East New York, Five Star blends documentary and fiction as director Keith Miller (Welcome to Pine Hill) carefully eschews worn clichés of gang culture to offer a compelling portrait of two men as they are both forced to confront the question of what it really means to be a man.

Gabriel, directed and written by Lou Howe. (USA) – World Premiere. Rory Culkin delivers an electrifying performance as Gabriel, a vulnerable and confused teenager longing for stability and happiness. Convinced that reuniting with his old girlfriend will bring his dreams to fruition, Gabriel risks it all in a desperate and increasingly obsessive pursuit. First-time writer-director Lou Howe authentically portrays the heartbreaking reality of a young man battling his inner demons, establishing himself as an extraordinary new filmmaking talent.

Glass Chin, directed and written by Noah Buschel. (USA) – World Premiere. After going down in the fifth round, boxer Bud Gordon bowed out of the limelight. Now residing in a fixer-upper apartment in New Jersey with his girlfriend, Bud longs for his former Manhattan glory. In an effort to get back in the game, he makes a deal with a crooked restaurateur. But quick schemes rarely bring easy pay-offs and as the consequences of his business negotiations unfold, Bud has to make a choice between his integrity and his aspirations.

Goodbye to All That, directed and written by Angus MacLachlan. (USA) – World Premiere. Otto Wall is just a little unlucky in life, and unbeknownst to him, in love. When his wife suddenly asks for a divorce, he bounces between a search for answers, desperate attempts to stay connected to his daughter, and his fateful reentry into the dating pool. Junebug screenwriter Angus MacLachlan returns to the woods of North Carolina for this sharp and sensitive comedy starring Paul Schneider, Melanie Lynskey, Heather Graham, Anna Camp, Amy Sedaris, and Celia Weston.

Güeros, directed and written by Alonso Ruiz Palacios, co-written by Gibrán Portela. (Mexico) – North American Premiere. A water balloon suddenly dropping from the sky exploding on a mother’s head in the frantic first moments of this striking debut feature, announces its director, Alonso Ruiz Palacios, as a bold new voice of Mexican cinema. Set amidst the 1999 student strikes in Mexico City, this coming-of-age tale finds two brothers venturing through the city in a sentimental search for an aging legendary musician. Shot in beautiful black-and-white, Güeros brims with youthful exuberance. In Spanish with subtitles.

Human Capital (Il capitale umano), directed and written by Paolo Virzì, co-written by Francesco Bruni and Francesco Piccolo. (Italy, France) – International Premiere. In Paolo Virzì’s refined three-chapter tale, we begin at the end. Approaching a snowy night from three vastly different perspectives, the lives of two generations overlap as they tumble toward an ill-fated event that inextricably links them. Starring two of Italy’s leading actresses, Valeria Golina and Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Human Capital twists love, class, and ambition into a singular, true-life story that exposes the consequences of valuing certain human lives over others. In Italian with subtitles.

The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq (L'Enlèvement de Michel Houellebecq), directed and written by Guillaume Nicloux. (France) – North American Premiere. If novelist Michel Houellebecq had indeed been kidnapped during his 2011 promotional book tour, this may have been the definitive documentary on the case. As a wild alternative, Guillaume Nicloux presents this work of complete fiction starring none other than Houellebecq himself.  Playfully speculating on the explanation for Houellebecq's mysterious disappearance, this highly entertaining, farcical piece of cinema parallels the wry characteristics of its unique and ever-unconventional subject. In French with subtitles.

Loitering with Intent, directed by Adam Rapp, written by Michael Godere and Ivan Martin. (USA) – World Premiere.  After running into a film producer eager to invest in a new project, aspiring writers Dominic and Raphael need to come up with a script fast, so the pair head to the seclusion of rural Fire Island, NY, to churn out their masterpiece. But when Dominic’s siren of a sister (Marisa Tomei) turns up desperate for reprieve from her boyfriend (Sam Rockwell), they soon realize they’re in for more than they bargained for. Isabelle McNally and a hilarious Brian Geraghty round out this latest effort from director Adam Rapp.

Something Must Break (Nånting Måste Gå Sönder), directed and written by Ester Martin Bergsmark, co-written by Eli Levén. (Sweden) – North American Premiere. When Sebastian meets Andreas for the first time, he knows they belong together. While Sebastian defies gender norms—flouting convention in his androgynous fluidity—straight-identifying Andreas becomes unable to accept his attraction to another man, as their relationship progresses. Struggling with his identity, Sebastian becomes increasingly determined to become “Ellie,” even if it means walking away from Andreas. Something Must Break brims with raw electricity as it explores questions of gender and sexuality with refreshing candor. In Swedish with subtitles.

X/Y, directed and written by Ryan Piers Williams. (USA) – World Premiere. Ryan Piers Williams directs and stars alongside America Ferrera, Amber Tamblyn  and Melonie Diaz in a character-driven drama centered around four restless New Yorkers, and their shifting sexual and romantic relationships as they search for a sense of intimacy and self-identity. As Mark, Jen, Sylvia, and Jake navigate through their emotionally-arrested states, X/Y reveals the honest and wanton desire we all have to connect with someone and what is at stake when that connection fades.

Zero Motivation, directed and written by Talya Lavie. (Israel) – World Premiere. Filmmaker Talya Lavie steps into the spotlight with a dark comedy about everyday life for a unit of young female Israeli soldiers. The human resources office at a remote desert base serves as the setting for this cast of characters, who bide their time pushing paper, battling for the top score in Minesweeper, and counting down the minutes until they can return to civilian life. Amidst their boredom and clashing personalities, issues of commitment—from friendship to love and country—are handled with humor and sharp-edged wit. In Hebrew with subtitles.

This article is related to: Tribeca Film Festival, Filmmaker Toolkit: Tribeca Film Institute, News, Lineups







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