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Watch: Trailer for Francis Ford Coppola's Cheap-Looking Horror Bore "Twixt"

Photo of Nigel M Smith By Nigel M Smith | Indiewire August 2, 2011 at 8:23AM

Have we been punked? The first trailer for Francis Ford Coppola's gothic horror pic, "Twixt," hit the web today (it's the same footage he premiered at Comic-Con just over a week ago) and we're sad to report it's a cheap-looking snooze.
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Have we been punked? The first trailer for Francis Ford Coppola's gothic horror pic, "Twixt," hit the web today (it's the same footage he premiered at Comic-Con just over a week ago) and we're sad to report it's a cheap-looking snooze.

The clip lays out the basic plot: a horror writer (a bored-looking Val Kilmer) with a declining career, arrives in a small town on his latest book tour only to get caught up in a murder mystery involving a young Goth girl (Elle Fanning).

All of the lavishness he bestowed upon his last horror effort, "Bram Stoker's Dracula," is sorely missing from "Twixt," if the trailer is anything to go by. This digitally-shot and edited film was self-financed by Coppola and from the looks of it, he didn't have much to work with.

At Comic-Con, Coppola explained that he wants to take "Twixt" on the road, accompanied by a live band in the orchestra pit of seven or so theaters in key cities around the country. The project would also involve re-cutting the film per the audience's reaction. The narration and the film's music, by electronic artist Dan Deacon, would be altered based on how the new scenes were rearranged. Ideally, this tour would take place a month prior to the film's release.

The film premieres at the Toronto International Film Festival in September, so only time will tell whether this is the dud the preview makes it out to be. Did we mention two sequences are in 3D?

This article is related to: Twixt







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