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Werner Herzog Was Once Tricked Into Getting High and Other Highlights From His Vulture Interview

Photo of Casey Cipriani By Casey Cipriani | Indiewire August 4, 2014 at 11:58AM

In anticipation of the release of the new release "Herzog: The Collection" Blu-ray set, Werner Herzog participated in a Vulture interview where he divulged some hilarious insights from his life and filmmaking career. Here are the top highlights from the transcript.
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Werner Herzog
Werner Herzog
He rooted for Costa Rica during the World Cup…

"They are the quintessential underdog. They keep winning and winning and winning. Now, they may have come to the end of the line, but bravo! C'mon, that's the beauty of soccer. All of the sudden there comes a team, we have never heard any of the names, and they run their lungs out of their bodies. And they fight. They are wonderful."

But he doesn't like the over-dramatic diving that takes place in soccer…

"No, that's an awful disgrace. It's a disgrace. And it shouldn't be [allowed]. And all of them should learn from American football. And moreso, all of them should learn from rugby. What a manly, decent sport that is. There is a great kind of honor to rugby. I really love rugby for that."

He has never been under the spell of psychedelic drugs...

"I simply don't like the culture of drugs."-Werner Herzog

"It's not a question of control. I simply don't like the culture of drugs. I never liked the hippies for it. I think it was a mistake to be all the time stoned and on weed. It didn't look right and it doesn't look right today either and the damage drugs have done to civilizations are too enormous. And besides, I don't need any drug to step out of myself. I don't want them and I do not need them. And you may not believe this, big-eyed as you sit here now, but I've not even taken a puff of weed in my life."

But he was tricked into taking some laced marmalade…

"I was completely stoned once with the composer Florian Fricke in Popol Vuh. I was at his home and he had pancakes and marmalade. And I smeared the marmalade and he started chuckling and chuckling. And I ate it and it tasted very well and I wanted another one and took another good amount of the marmalade and the marmalade had weed in it. He didn't even tell me. I was so stoned that it took me an hour to find my home in Munich. I circled the block for a full hour until finding my place. So I have had the experience."


Werner Herzog

He credits tourism with the degradation of global cultures…

"Mass tourism has done so much damage to culture. It's horrifying. And it's only part of more catastrophic events. For example, the spread of global culture is somehow diminishing existing languages. There's still about 6,000 languages. Ninety-five percent of all spoken languages will be extinct 50 years from now. And that's really catastrophic. What about the last Spanish-speaking person dying, and no more Don Quixote and no more great dramas and no more flamenco and no more great poetry? Just imagine that. Spanish will not die out that quickly, but marginal languages and cultures are dying left and right at catastrophic speed."

The outbursts of Nicolas Cage, Christian Bale and James Franco are nothing compared to those of the eccentric actors of the ‘70s and ‘80s…

"I should have made films about women all my life."-Werner Herzog

"But every single one of them is taken seriously by me. And I pay a lot of attention. And I always have one clear goal: He or she has to be better than ever before afterward in their lives. I want them to be. Nicolas Cage, for example. Nicole Kidman now. I should have made films about women all my life...[Laughs.] Sometimes I think, in particular now having done Queen of the Desert… I keep marveling at how good I am with a female star of my story."

Give the entire transcript a read over at Vulture.

This article is related to: Werner Herzog, Werner Herzog, Werner Herzog, New York Magazine, Vulture, Interview, Aguirre: The Wrath of God







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