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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: Sean Penn Gets His Full Robert Smith On In Clip From 'This Must Be The Place'

    Clip removed at the request of the filmmakers.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: The 'Little White Lies' That Bind Are Explored In This Leisurely Gallic Dramedy

    The nature of what keeps a long-term friendship together over the years is somewhat ephemeral. There is the trust and confidence that comes with knowing someone intimately, seeing them at their best and worst, and being there for them without judgment. But it's also built on shared values, small moments and significant times shared, building a collective history that binds dates and places with deep emotional resonance. But, everyone also has their secrets, and even the best of friends will often keep their own fears or secret desires to themselves, not only for the sake of a friendship but for their own private reasons as well. Now take all of that and multiply it a few times for a circle of friends, who have know each other for years and are now in their mid-thirties and you enter the world of Guillaume Canet's "Little White Lies," a sprawling dramedy that follows a few weeks in the lives of a close knit group going through some monumental changes.

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  • SydneysBuzz
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    ‘Apocalypse According to Doris’ - Opening night Spirit Quest Film Festival, Friday April 15

    Opening Night of The Spirit Quest Film Festival, an annual celebration of inspirational and thought provoking independent films from around the world will open this year with Apocalypse According to Doris which asks aloud questions about strange events not understood, things not investigated seriously, and maybe even suppressed by the mainstream media and the “powers-that-be.” It will also be screening in the Cannes Market where film vet, Jim Dudelson is launching Blairwood Entertainment the international sales company which will be representing worldwide rights for Apocalypse and three other new films.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    "Atlas Shrugged" Has Finally Arrived!

    "Now I am faced with this movie, the most anticlimactic non-event since Geraldo Rivera broke into Al Capone's vault." - Roger Ebert

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  • The Playlist
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    First Look At Tilda Swinton & John C. Reilly In Lynne Ramsay's 'We Need To Talk About Kevin'

    It has been almost a decade since Lynne Ramsay's "Morvern Callar," and while some of that time was spent on an adaptation of "The Lovely Bones" that was scuttled (with Peter Jackson later delivering his take on the material to theaters), we're glad she's finally back. Next month she'll hit Cannes with "We Need To Talk About Kevin" another tough drama that promises to be a doozy.

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  • The Lost Boys
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    The Rumoured Lesbianism of Laureen Harper, Canada's First Lady

    I'd wager that less than 20% of Canadians even know Laureen Harper's name, let alone think she's a lesbian. It's one of the huge contrasts between American and Canadian politics... If a considerable rumour started that Michelle Obama had secretly moved out of the White House to shack up with a lady, it would be on the cover of everything... But in Canada, where Laureen Harper is indeed the wife of our Prime Minister, it barely scratches the media surface (not even trashy gossip fare). For some time there's been rumours that Laureen had moved out over a year ago, taking residence at the Chateau Laurier to shack up with a female mountie. Considering there's an election going on, where Laureen's conservative husband is the frontrunner (and not exactly a friend of queer people), you'd think people would jump all over this.

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  • The Playlist
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    Watch: #2 Full-Length Trailer For 'Cowboys & Aliens' Beams Onto Earth

    Well, if the goal was to hit mainstream America with this admittedly tough-to-market genre mash-up of western and sci-fi, Universal couldn't have chosen a more meat-and-potatoes crowd than the "American Idol" audience to show off the film to, and now that trailer has landed online for the rest of us to pick apart.

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  • The Playlist
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    Review: 'Armadillo' Is A Stark Portrait Of War That Asks Tough Questions

    You're not alone if, when discovering the release of a new war documentary, you let out a tired groan or mechanically turn away. These things have been coming out in droves for nearly a decade now, and truth be told, they're often similar in nature or intent and not always helmed by the swiftest of thinkers. That said, is it morally justified to ignore a contemporary subject because of over-saturation? As a society we can easily forget certain issues or events no matter how horrifying or terrible as they drift out of vogue (though we're not wholly responsible -- the media's focus is out of our hands), so how bad is it if we are consistently reminded of horrific pasts and presents?

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  • The Playlist
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    Legendary Scorsese/Tarantino DoP Robert Richardson Bringing Neil Gaiman's 'American Gods' To HBO

    Will Also Be Lensing Brad Pitt & Marc Forster's 'World War Z'Few authors have the devoted following that Neil Gaiman has. Since his early days in the comics world, the British sci-fi fantasy author and goth heartthrob, has consistently expanded his audience, to the extent that his books are now mainstays in the top reaches of the bestseller charts, and his 1.5 million Twitter followers hang on his every word. Furthermore, while he may not have the prose skills of a contemporary like, say, Michael Chabon, he's a hell of a storyteller, playing with myth and folklore and refashioning it into something new, and entirely compelling.

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  • REVERSEBLOG: the reverse shot blog
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    I Was a Teenage Frankenstein: Joe Wright's "Hanna"

    “A perfect soldier” is how a military bigwig approvingly describes a headless column of masculine muscle in Robert Minor’s notorious 1916 antiwar cartoon for The Masses. The same phrase appears late in Joe Wright’s Hanna, in the obligatory spell-it-out speech that explains the illicit genetics behind the eponymous heroine’s ability to cut bloody swaths through hordes of armed men. The difference here, of course, is that the killing machine is played by dainty, willowy Saoirse Ronan, whose uncanny appearance—a spectral paleness that seems to blur the boundaries separating her porcelain skin, blanched tresses, and ashen eyes—suggests a pubescent Tilda Swinton in makeup for a Village of the Damned remake. That might have been a nifty visual joke were the film able to register the absurdity and wild humor inherent in its sparrow-sized protagonist’s rampages. As it is, the tomboy-fu on display aims to goose the audience as much as Hit-Girl’s slice ‘n’ dice massacres in Kick-Ass while cloaking its questionable jollies with a veneer of art-house respectability. The resulting superficies often jangle and tingle, but the film’s vision of adolescence as fairy-tale espionage remains tastefully hollow, with its young heroine’s storms of violence increasingly becoming as calculated as any of Shirley Temple’s tap dances of pouting and sniffling. Read Fernando F. Croce's review of Hanna.

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